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REPORT 


CLASS OK 1858 


HARVARD COLLEGE. 


PREPARED FOR THE THIRTIETH ANNIVERSARY OF ITS 


GRADUATION. 


m f 


BOSTON: 


ALFRED MUDGE & SON, PRINTERS, 


24 Franklin Street. 


1888. 



? 

Oniv/ 

REPORT 



CLASS OF 1858 



HARVARD COLLEGE. 



PREPARED FOR THE THIRTIETH ANNIVERSARY OF ITS 
GRADUATION. 



in< 




BOSTON : 

ALFRED MUDGE & SON, PRINTERS, 

24 Franklin Street. 

1888. 



This report has been prepared under the direction of a Commit- 
tee consisting of our classmates Foote and Porter and myself, in 
accordance with a vote of the class requesting that it should be 
published on the thirtieth anniversary of our graduation. Reports 
have been previously published by Charles A. Allen, then Class 
Secretary, in 1861, and by the late George Dexter, Class Secre- 
tary, in 1864, 1868, and 1878, and the greater part of these previ- 
ous reports is here reprinted, together with such additional infor- 
mation as has been since obtained. Of the ninety-one members of 
the class who graduated, sixty-one are still living, nearly all of 
whom have replied to my circular letter of inquiry. Of the twenty- 
eight temporary members of the class, seven are known to have died, 
and several others have not been heard from by the Secretary for 
many years. I should be glad to receive further information con- 
cerning them at any time. 

The lives of our classmates who died in the war of 1 861 -1865 — 
Eells, Lowell, Mason, Patten, Richardson, and Spurr — are 
recorded in the Harvard Memorial Biographies more fully than is 
practicable within the limits of this report. 

I have been much assisted in preparing the report by Mr. 
Amory Eliot (H. U. 1877), and I desire also to acknowledge 
kind assistance received from Mr. William H. Tillinghast, of 

the University Library. 

JAMES C. DAVIS, 

Class Secretary. 
Boston, June 20, 1888. 



MEMBERS OF THE CLASS. 



Abercrombie, Otis Putnam. 

Adams, Henry. 

Allen, Charles Adams. 

Allen, Gideon. 

Ames, Fisher. 

Anderson, Nicholas Longworth. 
♦Bartlett, William Pitt Green- 
wood. 

Beals, Joshua Gardner. 

Bigelow, Alanson. 

Bliss, Eugene Frederick. 
♦Bradbury, Charles Brooks. 

Bradlee, Josiah. 

Brick, Riley Allen. 

Bromberg, Frederick George. 

Brown, Benjamin Graves. 

Burgess, George Canning. 

Burt, John Otis. 

Cabot, Louis. 
♦Chadwick, George Bradford. 

Cilley, Bradbury Longfellow. 

CiLLEY, Jonathan Longfellow. 
*Cobb, John Edward. 

Crosby, George Washington. 

Crowninshield, Benjamin William. 
*Damon, Howard Franklin. 

Davis, James Clarke. 
*Dexter, George. 
♦Dunning, William Hale. 

Edes, Robert Thaxter. 
*Eells, Samuel Henry. 
*Eliot, Paul Mitchell. 

Fairchild, Charles. 



Fette, William Eliot. 

Foote, Henry Wilder. 

Fox, William Henry. 

Francis, George Ebenezer. 

Frost, Henry Walker. 
♦Fuller, Simon Greenleaf. 
♦Gelston, Robert Bruce. 

Gilbert, Horatio James. 
♦Goodwin, Ozias. 

Gordon, William Gilchrist. 

Green, Samuel Swett. 

Hall, James Stevenson. 

Hartwell, Alfred Stedman. 

Haven, Alfred Houston. 
♦FIawes, Marcus Morton. 

Holbrook, Daniel. 

HoMANs, John. 
♦Hunnewell, Hollis. 

KiLBouRN, William Arthur. 
♦Kimball, Edward Harrington. 
♦Lamson, Ansel. 

Learoyd, Charles Henry. 
♦Lowell, James Jackson. 

Magoun, Thatcher. 
♦Mason, Edward Bromfield. 
♦May, James. 

Milton, William Frederick. 

Murdock, Seth Miller. 
♦Myrick, John Dole. 

Noble, George Washington Copp. 
♦Norcross, Frederick Malcolm. 

No yes, John Buttrick. 

Park, John Gray. 



1'asco, Samuel. 
♦Patten, Henry Lyman. 
♦Payne, Daniel Chamberlain. 
♦Phillips, John Charles. 

Pond, George Edward. 

Porter, Edward Griffin. 
♦Richardson, Henry Augustus. 
♦Russell, Nathaniel. 
♦Sawyer, Amory Pollard. 

Shaw, Joseph Alden. 
♦Shorey, Fk.\nk Howard. 
♦Spurr, Thomas Jefferson. 

Stoddard, John Thomas. 



SwiNERTON, John Putnam. 
Thurber, James Danforth. 
Tobey, Gerard Curtis. 
ToBEY, Hor.\ce Pratt. 
TopPAN, Robert Noxon. 
Townsend, James Percival. 
Treadwell, John Pearse. 
♦VicKERY, James Edward. 
Walcott, Henry Pickering. 
Warren, Winslow. 
Wentworth, George Albert. 
Wentworth, Samuel Hidden. 
Williams, Sydney Augustus. 



— 91 



TEMPORARY MEMBERS. 



Albee, John. 
♦Barrett, Edward Augustus. 

Cutter, Ralph Hastings. 
♦Dorr, Hazen. 

Dorr, Morris. 

Elliott, William. 

Emery, Samuel Hopkins. 

Fassitt, John Barclay. 

Gardner, John Lowell. 
♦Gates, James Wilder. 
♦Gibbons, William. 

Goodwin, Hersey Br.\dford. 

Gordon, George Huntly. 

Gr.\nger, George Frederick. 



Hall, William Payne. 
♦Hathaway, George Chandler, 
♦How, Henry Jackson. 

Jamieson, James. 
i|f Jones, Benjamin Dewees Marshall. 

Lawrence, Henry. 

Lee, William Henry Fitzhugh. 

Lowndes, Francis Lewis. 

Sprague, Charles Dominique. 
♦Stanwood, Frederick Williams. 

Tolman, George. 

Whitridge, Alonzo Claudius. 

Woods, Walter Hastings. 

Worcester, Leigh Richmond. 

— 28 



CLASS COMMITTEE. 



JAMES C. D.WIS, Secretary. ROBERT N. TOPPAN. 

S. A. WILLIAMS. 



HARVARD COLLEGE 

CLASS OF 18^8. 



OTIS PUTNAM ABERCROMBIE. — Born in Fitch- 
burg, Sept. 3, 1836; son of Otis and Dorothy L. (Putnam) 
Abercrombie. After graduation, he spent a year in Worces- 
ter, and began the study of law in the office of Messrs. 
Devens & Hoar. In September, 1859, he entered the Har- 
vard Law School, and remained in Cambridge three terms. 
In February, 1861, he removed to Springfield, and entered 
the office of Messrs. Beach & Bond. He was admitted to 
the bar in June, and in July received the degree of LL. B. 
In January, 1862, he opened an office in Milwaukee, Wis. ; 
remaining there until May, 1864, when he removed to 
Chicago, and opened an office at No. 88 Washington Street. 
He visited New England in the summer of 1862, and again 
in 1866. He entered the firm of Tenney, McClellan & Ten- 
ney, in October, 1870. They were burned out in the great 
fire of the next year. The style of the firm then became 
Tenneys, Flower & Abercrombie. He married, May 22, 
1873, Miss Kate M'Clure, of Milwaukee, who died in the 
following October. Remained in Chicago till June, 1880, 
when he removed to Gunnison, Col., then a new place in 
the Rocky Mountains, and remained there, engaged in the 
practice of his profession and attending to some mining 
interests, till June, 1885, when he returned to Lunenburg, 
Mass., where he has since remained. He is not at present 



engaged in any business, and has not been very well for the 
past year or more. From December, 1880, till he left Colo- 
rado, he was United States commissioner for that Judicial 
District. Address, Lunenburg, Mass. 

HENRY ADAMS. —Born in Boston, Feb. 16, 1838; 
son of Charles Francis and Abigail (Brooks) Adams. He 
sailed for Europe in October, 1858, and passed two years in 
Germany, much of the time at the universities. Returning 
to America in November, i860, he spent the winter in 
Washington as private secretary to his father, then a mem- 
ber of the House of Representatives. In 1861, Mr. Adams 
was appointed Minister to the Court of St. James ; and the 
family removed to England in April, where they remained 
until 1868. After travelling on the Continent, he returned 
to Boston in July, 1868. After his return from Europe, he 
spent considerable time in Washington. He was appointed 
Assistant Professor of History in Harvard College, in Sep- 
tember, 1870, and about the same time assumed the editor- 
ship of the " North American Review." He ceased to edit 
this in 1876, and resigned his professorship in June, 1877. 
He married, June 27, 1872, Marion, daughter of Dr. Robert 
W. Hooper, of Boston. He now resides in Washington, and 
is engaged in historical studies. He published " Chapters of 
Erie, and other Essays," in connection with his brother, 
Charles F. Adams, in 1871 ; "Essays in Anglo-Saxon Law," 
in 1876; "New England Federalism," in 1877; "Life of 
Albert Gallatin," in 1880; and " Life of John Randolph," in 
1882. Mrs. Adams died at Washington, Dec. 6, 1885. June 
3, 1886, he sailed for Liverpool, and visited Japan, returning 
in November. Address, 1603 H Street, Washington, D. C. 

CHARLES ADAMS ALLEN. —Born in North An- 
dover, Aug. 17, 1837; son of Charles Hastmgs and Sarah 
(Adams) Allen. He was Class Secretary from 1858 to 1864. 



i 



He was teacher of the High School in Concord, Mass., till 
September, i860, when he returned to Cambridge, and 
entered his name as a resident graduate. He was occupied 
with private pupils until September, 1861, when he entered 
the Unitarian Theological School at Meadville, Penn. From 
this he was graduated June 30, 1864, and commenced preach- 
ing in New England. In October, he gathered and organized 
a society in Montpelier, Vt., called the Church of the 
Messiah, and was ordained its minister March i, 1865. He 
prospered in his work, and dedicated a new church building 
in 1866. He resigned in 1869, and, after spending the win- 
ter of that year in Cambridge, sailed for Europe in the fol- 
lowing May. He was absent about one year. In 1872, he 
took charge of the Unitarian Society in Westborough, 
Mass., from which he was called to the society in Dover, 
N. H., in 1875; to Brunswick, Me., in April, 1879; and to 
New Orleans, La., in October, 1881, where he is still settled. 
He was married in Mexico, Mo., July 22, 1884, to Lydia G. 
Locke, formerly of Plymouth, Mass. During his ministry in 
New Orleans, a debt of fifteen thousand dollars on the 
church has been paid and the congregation more than 
trebled. Published an essay on "The Christian Enthusi- 
asm," in the "Unitarian Review" for April, 1888. He 
spends August and September in New England. Address, 
New Orleans, La. 

GIDEON ALLEN, Jr. — Born in New Bedford, Sept. 
27, 1837; son of Gideon and Betsey (Nye) Allen. He went 
to New York, and engaged in business there, shortly after 
graduation. He was married Oct. 16, i860, to Horatia, 
daughter of W. Howland, Esq., of Brooklyn. A daughter, 
named Mary Howland, was born to him in New Bedford, 
Dec. 20, 1 861. In February, 1862, he removed to California, 
and entered the firm of Messrs. Green, Heath & Allen, San 
Francisco. His daughter died there, March 13, 1862. In 



8 

April, 1865, he returned to New Bedford. A son, named 
George Swain, was born Dec. 9, 1867, and died April 15, 
1883. A daughter, Helen H., was born Feb. 27, 1878. Con- 
tinues to reside in New Bedford, Mass., and is engaged in 
business there with the Morse Twist and Drill Machine Co. 
Address, New Bedford, Mass. 



FISHER AMES.T7>,Born in Lowell, Jan. 24, 1838; son 
of Seth and Abby F.~(Dana) Ames. In September, 1858, 
he entered the Law School, but left it in the following Jan- 
uary, to enter the office of Messrs. Brooks & Ball, No. 40 
State Street, Boston. He returned to the Law School in 
September, and took his degree of LL. B. in i860. The 
next winter was passed in Dedham, in the office of Erastus 
Worthington, Esq. ; and in April, 1861, he entered Judge 
Abbott's office in Boston. He was admitted to the Suffolk 
bar in October, 1861, and commenced practice at No. 30 
Court Street. In September, 1863, he removed to South 
Boston. He purchased a farm in Hudson, 111., in September, 

1864, and stocked it with sheep; but, finding it unprofitable, 
sold it in November of the following year, and returned to 
Boston. He was married at Roxbury, Mass., to Virginia, 
daughter of the late George Lee, of New Orleans, Dec. 19, 

1865. In January, 1866, he went to Yazoo City, Miss., and 
made arrangements for planting cotton ; but, unable to secure 
laborers, abandoned the enterprise in April, and resumed the 
practice of his profession in Boston. He was appointed 
clerk to the City Solicitor, in May, 1866. Is engaged in the 
practice of his profession (law) in Boston. He has had four 
children: Rosalie, born Feb, 14, 1867; Fisher, April 17, 
1869; Abbie Dana, Sept. 15, 1871; and Bradford, Nov. 29, 
1874. Bradford died Jan. 28, 1885. He is the author of a 
small book entitled "Modern Whist," published by Harper 
& Bros, in 1879. He resides in West Newton. Has been 
secretary of the Newton Civil Service Reform Association ; 



for several years member of the school committee of New- 
ton, and chairman of the Board in 1885 ; and director of the 
Newton Athenaeum. Address, 14 Beacon Street, Boston. 

NICHOLAS LONGWORTH ANDERSON. -Born in 
Cincinnati, Ohio, April 22, 1838; son of Larz and Catherine 
(Longworth) Anderson. After graduation he visited the 
Northwest, and, in September, went to Europe with Adams, 
Cabot, Crowninshield, and Hunnewell. Studied at the Ger- 
man universities until November, i860, when he returned to 
America. He began the study of law in Cincinnati, but, on 
the breaking out of the Rebellion, enlisted in the Guthrie Gray 
Battalion as a private. He was commissioned as adjutant of 
the Sixth Regiment Ohio Volunteers, April 19, 1861 ; lieu 
tenant-colonel, June 12, 1861 ; and colonel, Aug. 19, 1862. 
He shared in the Western Virginia campaigns, and the marches 
and battles of Generals Buell, Rosecrans, and Thomas. He 
was slightly wounded at Shiloh, April 6, 1862, and more 
severely at Stone River, Jan. i, 1863, and Chickamauga, Sept. 
19, 1863. He was mustered out of service with his regiment 
in June, 1864. He has since been brevetted brigadier-general 
for gallant conduct at Stone River, and major-general for dis- 
tinguished gallantry at Chickamauga ; both commissions to 
date from March 13, 1865. After the war, resumed the study 
of law in Cincinnati. He married Elizabeth C. Kilgour, of 
Cincinnati, March 28, 1865. She is the daughter of the late 
John and Elizabeth (Higbee) Kilgour. He went with his 
wife to Europe, and spent eighteen months in travel. His 
son, Larz, was born in Paris, Aug. 15, 1866. He resumed his 
residence in Cincinnati in November. His second son, Carl 
Kilgour, was born there, Jan. 13,1 S68, and died at Long Branch, 
N. J., Aug. 27, 1869. Took degree of A. M. in 1871. A 
daughter, Elizabeth Kilgour, was born in Cincinnati, Aug. 12, 
1874. His son, Larz, fitted for Harvard at Exeter, and gradu- 
ates at Harvard in the class of 188S. Has travelled in Europe 



lO 

four times since marriage. Lived in Cincinnati till June, 1881, 
when he moved to Washington, where he has since resided. 
Address 1530 K Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

* WILLIAM PITT GREENWOOD BARTLETT. — 
Born in Boston, Oct. 27, 1837; son of George and Cathe- 
rine A. (Greenwood) Bartlett. Immediately after graduation, 
he accepted employment in the " Nautical Almanac " office, 
and was assistant computer there until 1861. In July, 1859, 
he was appointed proctor in the college. During this time 
he contributed much to the Mathematical Monthly and other 
newspapers, and was elected a member of the American 
Academy of Arts and Sciences. In the summer of i860, 
he went to Europe with Professor Peirce, to attend the anni- 
versary meetings of various scientific societies. He took his 
degree of A. M. at the Commencement of 1861. He re- 
signed his proctorship in November, 1862, but continued 
his connection with the "Nautical Almanac." His father 
died in the summer of 1864, and his family removed to Cam- 
bridge in the following October. About this time, his health, 
which was never robust, began to fail ; and he was not spared 
long to enjoy his new home. He died at his mother's house, 
Jan. 13, 1865. 

JOSHUA GARDNER BEALS. — Born in Boston, Aug. 
23, 1836; son of William and Dolly (Whitney) Beals. In 
September, 1858, he entered the Harvard Law School, but 
left it in March of the following year, to connect himself 
with the Boston Post,; newspaper, of which, in 1865, he be- 
came one of the publishers. In 1875, he sold his interest in 
the Boston Post newspaper. Soon after, he entered into a 
limited partnership with E. W. Foster, as general agents of 
the New York, Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul, Cincinnati, and 
other "newspaper unions." In 1880, he retired from active 
business. He was married, Oct. 25, 1865, to Edith Ware, 



1 1 

daughter of George W. Simmons, Esq., of Boston. Three 
children, Gertrude, Gardner, and Sidney Lane Beals, have 
been born. Address, 328 Dartmouth Street, Boston. 

ALANSON BIGELOW. — Born in Cambridge, Aug. 3, 
1837 ; son of Alanson and Anne R. (Bangs) Bigelow. After 
graduation, he entered the store of his father's firm, Messrs. 
Bigelow Brothers & Co., Boston. He married, Nov. 6, 1862, 
Sarah Elizabeth, daughter of George Lane, Esq., of Newton. 
A son, named Alanson, was born, Dec. 21, 1863. A second 
son, Ernest, was born, Feb. 3, r868, and is in the class of 
1890 at Harvard. A third son, Homer Lane, was born Dec. 
20, 1872, and is in the Cambridge Latin School. A daughter 
died in August, 1883, aged thirteen months. Another daugh- 
ter was born in December, 1884. He was admitted a part- 
ner in the business, April i, 1868, and the name of the firm 
changed to Bigelow, Kennard & Co. He resides in Cam- 
bridgeport. Address, 5 1 1 Washington Street, Boston. 

EUGENE FREDERICK BLISS. — Born in Granville, 
N. Y., July 31, 1836 ; son of Cyrus and Susan (Fisher) Bliss. 
In September, 1858, he entered the law office of Messrs. 
Conger and Hawes, Janesville, Wis. In 1859, he accepted 
the position of private tutor in the family of Mrs. Frederick 
Dabney, and sailed for Fayal, Sept. 17. He returned to 
Boston in May, 1861, and soon after resumed his studies in 
Janesville. He was admitted to the bar, June 14, 1862, and 
to practice in the Supreme Court, July 10. In September, 
1863, he removed to Cincinnati, and opened a private clas- 
sical school. He took the degree of A. M. in 1866. His 
life, as master of a private classical school in Cincinnati, 
Ohio, was only varied by an occasional summer vacation trip 
to Europe. In 1877, he associated with himself, as partner 
in his school, the Rev. J, Babin. He gave up his school in 
June, 1879, and has since been in no business. Early in 



12 

l88o, he went to Germany, returning in June of the next 
year. In the spring of 1883, he visited the Azores, and came 
back by way of Lisbon and Gibraltar. In June, 1885, was 
published the "Diary of David Zeisberger," in translating and 
editing which he had been busy for nearly two years. Ad- 
dress, No. 122 East 5th Street, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

* CHARLES BROOKS BRADBURY. —Born in Bos- 
ton, April 5, 1837 ; son of .Samuel Fox and Mary Ann 
(Leathe) Bradbury. He was appointed instructor of mathe- 
matics in Trinity School, New York, Sept. 15, 1858. In the 
autumn of 1863, he was made first assistant master of the 
school. He took his degree of A. M. in 1861. On July i, 
1863, he was married to Emily Harriette, daughter of Solo- 
mon and Harriette N. Sykes, of Peekskill, N. Y. A son, 
named Charles Fox, was born Nov. 4, 1864. His second 
child, Ellen Brooks, was born Jan. 6, 1871. He died in Mor- 
risania, N. Y., of phthisis, Feb. 21, 1885. His son, C. F. 
Bradbury, writes from Morrisania, June 8, 1885, as follows: 
"I can say little or nothing more of my father than has 
already appeared in the class reports. The tenor of his 
ways was even, as he has said. The twenty-seventh year of 
his graduation is just closing, as well as the twenty-seventh 
of his connection with Trinity School, having commenced 
teaching there in September after graduating, and living 
most of that time in Morrisania, which is now a part of 
New York City proper. He identified himself with St. 
Paul's Protestant Episcopal Church of this place, of which 
he was a vestryman for fourteen years and a warden for ten 
years. For twenty-one years he was the only remaining 
member of his father's family, and now my mother, sister, 
and self are the remnant of his." 

JOSIAH BRADLEE. — Born in Boston, Dec. 17,1837; 
son of Frederick Hall and Lucretia (Wainwright) Bradlee. 



13 

In October, 1858, he went to Europe, and remained there, 
travelling, and studying music, until August, 1863. He 
married, March 17, 1864, Alice, daughter of F. B. Crown- 
inshield, Esq., of Boston. He sailed again for Europe, 
March 30, and returned in about a year. He has four 
children : Sarah Crowninshield, born Feb. 5, 1865, in Paris, 
France; Frederic Josiah, born in Boston, March 28, 1866; 
James Bowdoin, born Jan. 31, 1873; and Francis Crownin- 
shield, born April 20, 1881. Portions of his time have been 
spent in Europe, but he has continued to reside in Boston, 
■first at No. 14 Marlboro' Street, and now at No. 247 Marl- 
boro' Street. 

RILEY ALLEN BRICK. — Born in New York City, 
Oct. 7, 1837; son of Joseph W. and Margaret (Allen) Brick. 
After graduation he succeeded to the iron business estab- 
lished by his father, in New York. He took charge of the 
Bergen Iron Works, Feb. i, 1859, and continued in this 
employment for some years. He married, Jan. 10, 1861, 
Hannah Stone, daughter of Charles H. Brown, Esq., of 
Boston. His son, Arthur Wilkinson, was born Oct. 7, 1867. 
He has been a director in the Bridgeport and the West- 
chester County Gas Companies ; in the New York Bible 
Society and Young Men's Christian Association ; a trustee 
and treasurer of the House of Mercy ; and a trustee of St. 
Luke's Hospital. Since 1868 he has devoted himself to 
the development of the town of Bricksburg, Ocean County, 
N. J., located on the line of the New Jersey Southern Rail- 
road, and to the building of the Union Gas Works and the 
Northern Gas Works, both of New York. He was president 
of the first corporation until 1874, and has been treasurer 
of the second. He had a daughter born in 1S71, who lived 
but a short time. His son, Arthur W., died Jan. 18, 1^82. 
Address, 25 East 38th Street, New York City. 



u 

FREDERICK GEORGE BROMBERG. — Born in New 
York City, June 19, 1837; son of Frederic and Lisette C. 
(Beetz) Bromberg. After graduation he spent some time in 
Mobile, engaged in study and teaching. In January, i860, 
he was in New Orleans, in business as an agent for Bromberg 
& Son, piano-forte makers. In June, 1861, he returned to 
Cambridge, and studied chemistry in the Lawrence Scientific 
School. In September, 1863, he was appointed a tutor of 
mathematics in Harvard College. He resigned in July, 1865, 
and returned to Mobile in the autumn. In June, 1867, he 
was elected a delegate to the first Republican State Conven- 
tion held in Alabama, from Mobile. He was appointed city 
treasurer of Mobile by General Pope, commanding the district, 
July 26, 1867. In February, 1868, he was elected to the 
State Senate from Mobile, under the new constitution. He 
served in the Alabama State Senate until November, 1872. 
He was appointed postmaster at Mobile, in July, 1869, from 
which office he was removed in June, 1871, the place being 
wanted for some adherent of Senator Spencer, who at that 
time controlled the Federal patronage in Alabama. He was 
chairman of the Alabama delegation to the Cincinnati Con- 
vention of 1872; and, in October of that year, received a 
nomination for Representative of the First Alabama District 
in Congress. He was elected as a Liberal Republican, and 
served in the Forty-third Congress. He was a member of the 
Committee on Commerce, of the subcommittee m regard to 
the " Eads Jetties," and was active in an endeavor to estab- 
lish a national system of quarantine measures. He intro- 
duced the resolution instructing the Committee on Banking 
to inquire into the management of the Freedman's Savings 
Bank, which finally led to the exposure and closing of that 
institution. He was renominated for the Forty-fourth Con- 
gress in 1874, but was defeated by Jeremiah Haralsson, a 
colored man, candidate of the administration party. He con- 
tested the seat, but the House decided against him. In 



15 

August, 1876, he was again nominated for Congress by a 
meeting of citizens dissatisfied with the action of the regular 
convention. This nomination was indorsed by the Repub- 
lican Convention, and Bromberg claims that he vkras elected 
but was "counted out." He was admitted to the bar Dec. 
22, 1876. He was, in 1877, chairman of the Executive Com- 
mittee of the " People's party," which carried the election. 
He writes, in 1878, that he "has permanently abandoned 
active political management, after more than ten years' con- 
tinuous service in both the great national parties." He has 
written two articles on " The Law of National Quarantine." 
The first appeared originally in the " Southern Law Jour- 
nal," December, 1878, and the second appeared in the Trans- 
actions of the Medical Association of the State of Alabama 
for 1880. ■" Report on Legal Education and Admission to the 
Bar " appeared in " Southern Law Journal," 1881. Article on 
"Legal Mathematics" appeared in "Alabama Law Journal," 
1884. Article "On the Study of Greek" appeared in the 
Nation, Nov 15, 1883. He was tendered the nomination, by 
the " Citizens' party," of State senator from Mobile County for 
four years, at the 1884 election, but declined. The " Citizens'^ 
party " carried the election by a majority of more than three 
to one. Has been chairman of the Committee on Correspond- 
ence of the Alabama State Bar Association, by annual reap- 
pointment, for the last three or four years, and author of the 
reports of that committee to be found in the annual reports 
of the meetings of the Bar Association during that period. 
He is one of the vice-presidents of that association durmg 
the current year, and one of the delegates to represent that 
body at the national meeting of bar associations, held May 
22, at Washington, D. C. He represented the Mobile Cot- 
ton Exchange and the Chamber of Commerce as the only 
delegate sent by them to the Western Water Ways Con- 
vention, held in Memphis, Tenn., in October, 1887, and was 
a member of the Committee on Resolutions of that body. 



i6 

He visited Boston in May, 1888. His address is Mobile, 

Ala. 

BENJAMIN GRAVES BROWN. — Born in Marble- 
head, Feb. 22, 1837; son of Samuel Horton and Mary Eliza- 
beth (Graves) Brown. He was in charge of MarbJehead 
Academy from December, 1858, till August, 1861, when he 
was appointed tutor of mathematics in Tufts College. He 
held this position until July, 1865, when he was elected 
Walker Professor of Mathematics. At the same time he 
received the degree of A. M. from Tufts College. He married 
in Marblehead, Feb. 12, 1863, Rosalia, daughter of Jonas 
Wilson Glenton, of England, and Teresa Gonzales, of Leon 
de Nicaragua. Is still Walker Professor of Mathematics in 
Tufts College. He has two children living, Robert Calthrop, 
born June i,, 1866, and Henrietta Noble, born July 4, 1871. 
Two daughters — Lizzie Teresa, born Jan. 31, 1864, died 
Feb. 7, 1865 ; ^nd Rosa Glenton, born March 8, 1869, died 
March 12, 1869 — made up the list of his family. Has been 
member of the School Committee of Somerville since 1872, 
except about twenty months. Address, College Hill, Mass. 

GEORGE CANNING BURGESS.— Born in Kingston, 
Mass., Dec. 9, 183 1 ; son of Charles and Anne (Prince) 
Burgess. From September, 185S, to Aug. 9, 1861, he was 
teacher of the High School in Dighton. In November, 1861, 
he became cashier of the Dighton Woollen Company. Leav- 
ing the woollen business in May, 1864, he became treasurer 
of the Union Manufacturing Company, in Dighton, in July. 
From August, 1866, to 1868, he was engaged in the furniture 
business. He married Emma J. Cobb, of Dighton, April i, 
1863. His children are : Percival Gordon, born Feb. 20, 
1864; George Herbert, born Nov. 28, 1867; Harrison 
Goodrich, born July 23, 1869; Ruth Prince, born July 14, 
1S70; Charles Stevens, born Feb. 14, 1873; and Caroline 



17 

Hastings, born July 17, 1880. In 1868, he became agent for 
the Travelers Insurance Company ; and, in November, 1869, 
removed from Dighton to Portland, Me. A year afterward, 
he accepted a situation in the house of E. Churchill & Co., 
West India importers and commission merchants, of that 
place, which he held for several years. He has been for 
some years a member of the Portland School Board, Secretary 
of the Haydn Association, and Secretary of the Mercantile 
Library Association. At the celebration of the one hundred 
and fiftieth anniversary of his native town (Kingston, Mass.), 
June 27, 1876, he prepared and read the poem. He has also 
published a poem for the twenty-lifth anniversary of the Port- 
land Mercantile Library Association. He is one of the Vice- 
Presidents of the Harvard Club of that city. In 1882, he 
was elected one of the principal assessors of the city of Port- 
land for three years, but resigned in 1883, when he was 
elected City Clerk of the city of Portland, which position he 
now holds. In April, 1887, he was appointed a member of 
the Board of Health for three years, and by the board elected 
Secretary and Executive Officer, and as such has written two 
annual reports. Has become a member of the Maine Genea- 
logical Society. Address, 55 Atlantic Street, Portland, Me. 

JOHN OTIS BURT.— Born in Syracuse, N. Y., April 
27, 1835 ; son of Aaron and Eleanor R. (Otis) Burt. He 
wrote to the Secretary in May, 1885, as follou's : " I left col- 
lege in the spring of 1858, and travelled in Europe that year, 
with Joseph May of 1857. Before leaving Cambridge, I had 
asked our admirable President Walker, if my previous work 
might not entitle me to a degree, but received no definite 
answer. In August of that year, while on board a steamer 
on the Lake of Constance, I met Professor Francis Bowen, 
with whom I afterwards walked through part of Switzerland. 
He informed me that he remembered that my diploma had 
been granted at the last Faculty meeting which he attended, 



i8 

and I received it in due time on my return. In 1859-60, I 
studied medicine in Cambridge with Professor Jeffries Wy- 
man, in Boylston Hall, and attended lectures at the Harvard 
Medical School. In i860, went to New York City and en- 
tered the College of Physicians and Surgeons as student of 
Dr. John C. Dalton. In April, i86(, when the city was in a 
fever of excitement, I enlisted in the Ninth Regiment New 
York Volunteers, Colonel Van Huren ; but there was such 
delay in fitting out the regiment for service, that I entered 
the navy as assistant surgeon, passing the regular examina- 
tion and obtaining my commission July 30, 1861. Was or- 
dered to the frigate Colorado in the Gulf squadron under 
Farragut, and later to the Naval Hospital at the mouth of the 
Mississippi with Surgeon Philip S. Wales. After the capture 
of New Orleans, I was ordered to the Mississippi squadron, 
and assigned to the iron-clad Cairo, Lieut. -Commander Sel- 
fridge. Scon after, the Cairo was destroyed by a torpedo 
in the Yazoo River, noticeable as the first time a torpedo 
was ever effectively employed in warfare — the small begin- 
ning of our present great torpedo service. This one was a 
simple affair, but sufficed to blow the whole bottom out of 
our boat, which sank, in about six minutes, in six or seven 
fathoms of water. (She was attempting to get to the rear of 
the Vicksburg works.) I was then ordered to the gunboat 
Conestoga, where I remained till Nov. 23, 1863, when I 
resigned my commission on account of continued ill health. 
I married, Feb. 25, 1864, Helen Narcissa Moulton, of Marcy, 
Oneida County, N. Y., daughter of Dr. Franklin and Almira 
(Cary) Moulton. After a year's residence in Paris and 
Vienna, occupied in medical study, I returned to New York 
and graduated in medicine at the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons. Have since resided principally in Syracuse, N. Y. 
I have not been able to do a full practice owing to bad health 
contracted during my Mississippi service, where I served 
summer and winter without a day's leave of absence, in a try- 



19 

ing climate. Have held the office of City Physician (Health 
Physician) in Syracuse, and was for four or five years one of 
the visiting physicians to St. Joseph's Hospital. When the 
Geneva Medical College was removed to Syracuse, and be- 
came the Medical Department of Syracuse University, I was 
appointed Assistant Professor of Chemistry, of which branch 
I later had full charge, and established the present laboratory. 
I was afterwards made Professor of Materia Medica, but soon 
after gave up my connection with the college, after a service 
of seven years. Went to Fayal, Azores, for a time, and re- 
turned to Syracuse. My wife died Jan. 4, 1873, after a few 
days' illness, of typhoid pneumonia, leaving three children : 
Arthur Temple, born in Paris, France, Dec. 17, 1864 5 Aaron 
Moulton, born in Syracuse, N. Y., May i, 1866; and John 
Otis, Jr., born in Syracuse, May 16, 1869. My oldest son is 
a farmer in the Onondaga Valley, and married, April 3, 1885, 
Emma J. Hunt. The second son is with a surveying party 
on the Grand River, Colorado. The youngest is attached 
to the nautical school ship St. Mary's, now on a cruise to 
the Azores and Mediterranean ports." May 21, 1888, he 
writes : " Since last report I have been ' invested with the 
ancient and honorable title of grandfather.' My oldest son, 
Arthur, has a child, born in May, 1887, and named Helen 
Lucy." Address, 46 Warren Street, Syracuse, N. Y. 

LOUIS CABOT. —Born in Brookline, July i, 1837; son 
of Samuel and Eliza (Perkins) Cabot. He sailed for Europe 
in October, 1858, and remaineji one year. Shortly after his 
return, he began the study of architecture in the office of Mr. 
E. C. Cabot, Boston. He received a commission as second 
lieutenant, First Massachusetts Cavalry, Dec. 26, 1861. He 
was commissioned first lieutenant. Second Massachusetts 
Cavalry, Jan. 15, 1863 ; captain in same regiraent. May 12, 
1863 ; major in Fourth Massachusetts Cavalry, Jan. 25, 1864. 
He saw much active service in Virginia with these regiments. 



20 

He left the army by resignation, Jan. ^7, 1865. He resides 
in Brookline. He was married, April 22, 1869, to Amy, 
daughter of Augustus Hemenvvay, of Boston. Address, 
Brookline, Mass. 

* GEORGE BRADFORD CHADWICK. — Born in 
Ipswich, Jan, 3, 1836; son of George and Susan Brewster 
(Gilbert) Chadwick. After graduation, he lived in Salem, 
and studied architecture, for which he had developed a taste 
while in college, with George Sewall, Esq., of Boston. In 
September, i860, he removed to New York, and studied with 
R. M. Hunt, Esq. Ill health soon forced him to relinquish 
his studies. He came to Northampton in May, 1861, in 
the hope of gaining strength, but failed rapidly, and finally 
died there, Aug. 12, 1861. 

BRADBURY LONGFELLOW CILLEY. — Born in 

Nottingham, N. H., Sept. 6, 1838; son of Joseph Longfellow 
and Lavinia Bayley (Kelly) Cilley. He was appointed tutor 
in Albany Academy, New York, Dec. 6, 1858, and remained 
there until Feb. 14, 1859, when he was made assistant master 
at Phillips Exeter Academy. He took his degree of A. M. in 
1862. He married, Aug. 3, 1864, Amanda C, daughter of 
John and Amanda (Currier) Morris, of Dover, N. H. A son, 
named Frank Morris, was born Dec. 12, 1866. His daughter, 
Lavinia, was born Sept. 13, 1868, and died Dec. 4, 1876. 
His son, Robert Longfellow, born Dec. 17, 1870, died Dec. 13, 
1 87 1. His son, Gilbert Longfellow, born March 6, 1874, died 
April 5, 1876. Daughter Mabel, born Nov. 14, 1878 ; and 
daughter Helen, born Aug. 30, 1882. Continues to be Pro- 
fessor of Ancient Languages in Phillips Exeter Academy. 
Is a member of the New Hampshire Historical Society ; cor- 
responding member of the New York Historical Society; 
member of the Webster Historical Society; also, of the 
American Philological Association. His son F'rank is in 



21 

the employ of the C, B. & Q. R. R,, at Chicago. Address, 
Exeter, N. H. * 

JONATHAN LONGFELLOW CILLEY. ~ Born in Cin- 
cinnati, 0„ Jan. 25, 1838; son of Jonathan and Sarah (Lee) 
Cilley. After graduation, he began the study of medicine 
with Dr. W. H. Mussey, in Cincinnati. During 1863, he was 
carrying on a farm in Glendale, O., ill health having com- 
pelled him to give up his medical studies. In 1864, he served 
in the Seventh Ohio National Guard (100 days men), and 
afterwards went into the navy, and served on the Mississippi 
River gunboats. He took his medical degree from the Miami 
Medical College of Cincinnati, March i, 1866, and was ap- 
pointed one of the physicians in the Commercial Hospital of 
that city. Continues to practise medicine at Cincinnati, O, 
He became Demonstrator of Anatomy in the Miami Medical 
College of that city in September, 1871 ; and Professor of 
Physiology and Histology in the Ohio College of Dental Sur- 
gery in November, 1873. ^^^ was married, April 26, 1869, to 
Mary P. Hubbard, of Sunnyside, Ky. He has a daughter 
named May, born Jan. 19, 1870 ; a son named Raymond, born 
Dec. 5, 1871 ; a son born Feb. 7, 1878, named Morgan ; and 
a daughter, Lucia, born July 13, 1880. He has done some 
writing for medical journals, and notice has been taken of his 
articles in medical journals of other cities. Prof. T. Dwight, 
of the Harvard Medical School, gives him the credit, in a foot- 
note in his work entitled " Frozen Sections," of being the 
first in English writings correctly to describe what medical 
men understand as the main fissure of the lungs. He is of 
reputation as an anatomist. He severed his connection with 
the Miami Medical College in June, 1878, and associated 
himself with "The Medical College of Ohio," in October of 
the same year. With it he is still connected, having been its 
Demonstrator in Anatomy till March, 1887, when he was made 
Adjunct Professor of Anatomy. He is also lecturer in Oste- 



22 

'ology, having filled that lectureship sinq^ the spring of 1882. 
He resigned his position in the Ohio College of Dental Sur- 
gery in 1880. In October, 1887, he was appointed Lecturer 
on Artistic Anatomy in the Cincinnati Museum Association 
Art Academy. Address, 411 Broadway, Cincinnati, O. 

*JOHN EDWARD COBB. —Born in Sandwich, Aug. 2, 
1836; son of the Rev. Asahel Cobb. Immediately after 
graduation he began the study of medicine with Dr. Hubbard, 
in Taunton. He attended lectures in the Harvard Medical 
School, and was also house pupil in the Chelsea Marine Hos- 
pital. He took, his degree of M. D. in March, 1861, and 
opened an office in Weir Village, Taunton. In September, 
l86i, he went into the navy as acting assistant surgeon. 
He was on the Ino in 1861 ; on the Kensington, Western 
Gulf squadron, in 1863. In October, 1863, he was ordered 
to tjie supply steamer Newbern, North Atlantic blockad- 
ing squadron. In February, 1865, he was ordered to the 
Florida. He resigned his commission, May 25, 1865, hav- 
ing been married to Abby Tobey, daughter of the Hon. 
Willard Nye, of New Bedford, Jan. 12, 1865. He settled in 
Taunton, and was engaged in the practice of his profession 
there until November, 1869, when he accepted a position in 
the Boston Custom House, which he retained until May, 1874, 
when failing health compelled him to abandon all active 
employment. He returned to Taunton, where, during the 
remainder of his life, he was confined to his room, and, during 
a great part of the time, to his bed, suffering under a disease 
contracted in his naval services before Port Hudson and Vicks- 
burg, ten years earlier. He was removed to New Bedford in 
the spring of 1877, where he died Sept. 23, 1877. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON CROSBY. —Born in Leom- 
inster, Oct. 23, 1835 ; son of John and Elizabeth (Wilkins) 
Crosby. He was taken sick with fever shortly before our 



23 

Class Day, and confined at home with illness for nearly a 
year. In the spring of 1859, he was teaching in Brooklyn, 
N. Y. ; and in Bradford in the autumn. The following winter 
he taught in King George County, Va. In i860, he was in 
his brother's jewelry store in Boston. He became book-keeper 
to Messrs. Tower & White, Hanover Street, Boston, in 1862. 
During 1863-64, he occupied the same position with Messrs. 
Wilcox, White & Co., Winter Street. He became book-keeper 
with Messrs. R. H. White & Co., in 1865, and now has charge 
of the book-keeping and of the finances and credits of the same 
firm. He was married, June 6, 1869, to Helen A. Searle, of 
Newark, N. J. His son, Charles Francis, was born June 23, 
1 87 1, and died July 11, of the same year. His son, John 
Francis, was born July 2, 1872. He lives in Newton. Ad- 
dress, 518 Washington Street, Boston. 

BENJAMIN WILLIAM CROWNINSHIELD. — Born 
in Boston, March 12, 1837; son of Francis Boardman and 
Sarah Gooll (Putnam) Crowninshield. In October, 1858, he 
sailed for Europe, and spent the winter in Hanover. Passing 
the next winter in Berlin, he returned to this country in No- 
vember, i860, and entered the office of the Merrimack Manu- 
facturing Company, of which his father was treasurer. He 
was commissioned first lieutenant in the First Massachusetts 
Cavalry, Dec. 19, 1861 ; captain in the same regiment, March 
26, 1862; major, Aug. 10, 1S64. He distinguished himself in 
several engagements in Virginia. He served on the staff of 
Major-General Sheridan as aide-de-camp and provost marshal 
general from July 26 to Nov. i, 1864. He was discharged 
from the army at the expiration of his term of service, Nov. 
7, 1864. Was made brevet colonel, June 17, 1865. He took 
his degree of A. M. in course, in i86i. He was married, Dec. 
15, 1866, to Katharine May, daughter of James Bowdoin Brad- 
lee, Esq., of Boston. He removed to New York, and entered 
the dry-goods commission business, Jan. i, 1867. The name 



24 

of his firm was Sprague, Colburn & Co. He returned to 
Boston in the spring of 1869, where he became a member of 
the firm of Wheelwright, Anderson & Co., dry-goods commis- 
sion merchants, at No. 70 Franklin Street, and in 1879 retired 
from business. Became a resident of Marblehead, Mass., in 
1881. In winter, lives at 209 Beacon Street, Boston. He has 
five children : Bowdoin Bradlee, born Oct. 13, 1867; Francis 
Boardman, born April 22, 1869; Benjamin Williams, born 
April 21, 1871 ; Katharine Bradlee, born Nov, 5, 1874; and 
Emily, born June 18, 1879. " Boys i and 2 in Harvard 
College '90 and '91, and No. 3 in the best school in Boston 
— Noble's." Address, 22 Congress Street, Boston. 

* HOWARD FRANKLIN DAMON.— Bprn in Scituate, 
April 6, 1833; son of Calvin and Lucy B. (Clapp) Damon. 
Immediately after graduation, he began the study of medicine 
at the Harvard Medical School, and in 1S61, received the de- 
gree of M. D. At the same Commencement he took his 
degree of A. M. He was appointed district physician to the 
Boston Dispensary in 1862, and shortly afterwards, its super- 
intendent. He was appointed admitting physician to the City 
Hospital in 1864 ; in April, 1868, a new department, for the 
treatment of skin diseases among out-patients, having been 
established, he was selected to take charge of it. He was a 
member of the Massachusetts Medical Society ; the Boston 
Society for Medical Improvement ; and the American Medical 
Association. To the anniversary meetings of this last, he was 
three times a delegate, and at its Boston meeting he was one 
of the committee of arrangements. He was Secretary of the 
Boston Society for Medical Observation, and of the Boston 
Obstetrical Society. He delivered a poem before the Mercan- 
tile Library Association, in November, 1858, which has since 
been printed. He gained the Boylston medical prize, with an 
essay on " Leucocythemia," Aug. 5, 1863, which was published 
in the next year. He published " Neuroses of the Skin," 



25 

" Photographs of the Skin," and several other medical treatises. 
He continued to practise medicine in Boston until his death, at 
his residence, 2 Decatur Street, Sept. 17, 1884. 

JAMES CLARKE DAVIS. — Born in Greenfield, Jan. 
19, 1838 ; son of George T. and Harriet T. (Russell) Davis, 
After graduation, he began the study of law in his father's 
office in Greenfield, and pursued it there, and in the Harvard 
Law School (where he spent a year), until Jan. 16, i86i,\vhen 
he was admitted to the bar, and became a member of his 
father's firm at Greenfield. On Jan. i, 1862, he removed to 
Boston, where he has since practised law. He was appointed 
clerk to the Attorney-General of the Commonwealth, Jan. 18, 
1865, and Assistant Attorney-General, April i, 1868. He 
prepared for the city of Boston "A Digest of Decisions of 
Municipal Interest of the Supreme Judicial Court of Massa- 
chusetts," which was published by the city in 1866. He re- 
signed the position of Assistant Attorney-General, March i, 
1873. He was married, June 3, 1873, to Alice W., daughter 
of the late Charles Paine, Esq., of Worcester, Mass. A daugh- 
ter, Ellen Harriet, was born Nov. 20, 1876. A second daugh- 
ter, Alice Paine, was born Aug. 15, 1882. Changed his resi- 
dence from No. 4 Mt. Vernon Place, Boston, to Forest Hills 
Street, Jamaica Plain, in April, 1883. Removed his office 
from 30 Court Street to the Mason Building in November, 
1886. Visited Europe in the summer of 1878, also in the 
summer of 1881. Was a member of the School Committee of 
Boston, 1882-87. Is one of the Trustees and Secretary of 
the Adams Nervine Asylum. Has the charge of Beck Hall, 
in Cambridge, and the Mason Building, in Boston, and of sev- 
eral trust estates. Address, 70 Kilby Street, Boston. 

* GEORGE DEXTER.— Born in Cincinnati, O., July 18, 
1838 ; son of Edmund and Mary A. (Dellinger) Dexter. In 
August, 1858, he sailed for Europe, and travelled in Germany 



26 

and France. Returning in December, he entered the Harvard 
Law School in March, 1859. He took his degree of LL. B. in 
18^0, and passed the next year in Cambridge as a resident grad- 
uate, He sailed again for Europe in July, 1 861, and returned in 
July, 1862, resuming his residence in Cambridge. In May, 
1864, he went to garrison the batteries at Provincetown, Cape 
Cod, in the Twelfth Unattached Company, M. V. M. He re- 
turned in August. He sailed again for Europe in September, 
1S65, and spent the winter in Paris. He travelled in Eng- 
land, and returned to this country in June, 1866. He was 
engaged in business in Maine during the autumn ; but finding 
it unprofitable, he gave it up, and returned to Cambridge in 
February, 1867, In September, 1869, he was appointed Tutor 
of Modern Languages in Harvard College, which place he re- 
signed in October, 1870, to take the office of Steward. H^ 
resigned this ofifice Dec. 31, 1871. He was married Sept. 17, 
1868, to Lucy Waterston, daughter of Charles Deane, Esq., of 
Cambridge. Their children are : Helen Ruthven, born June 
13, 1869; Lucy Waterston, born Oct. 3, 1870, died April 2, 
1873 ; Mary Deane, born Nov. 21, 1871 ; Margaret Ruthven, 
born July 15, 1875, died Jan. 11, 1881 ; and Julius, born April 
9, 1883, died Aug. 8, 1884. He was a member of the Amer- 
ican Antiquarian Society, and Recording Secretary of the 
Massachusetts Historical Society. He was Class Secretary 
from 1864 to 1883. He went to Europe for his health from 
October, 1880, to June, 1881. Aug, 30, 1883, he left Cam- 
bridge with his family, and went to Santa Barbara, Cal., to 
reside, and died there Dec. 18, 1883. 

* WILLIAM HALE DUNNING. — Born in Mobile, Ala., 
Nov. 12, 1836; son of Edward and Martha W. (Turner) Dun- 
ning. The first year after graduation, he was Classical Tutor 
in Williston Academy, Easthampton. He then returned to 
Cambridge, and entered his name as a resident graduate. In 
September, i860, he entered the Andover Theological Semi- 



27 

nary, from which he was graduated Aug, 3, 1863. He was 
ordained and installed as pastor of the First Congregational 
Church in Rockport, Mass., in February, 1864. On April 7 
of that year, he was married to Katherine Kelley, daughter of 
the Hon. Alfred and Mary (Welles) Kelley, of Columbus, O. 
In October, 1865, he obtained leave of absence for a year from 
his parish, on account of ill health, and immediately sailed for 
Europe. He resumed his parochial duties in November, 1866. 
His health was not so good as his friends could wish, and in 
September, 1867, he was, at his own request, dismissed from his 
pastoral charge. He made a visit to Ohio, and spent the win- 
ter in Augusta, Ga., whence he wrote that he was endeavoring 
to re-establish his health in a mild climate. He had one 
child, a son, Arthur Wilkinson, born Sept. 23, 1867. He 
returned to Ohio, and spent the summer of 1868 in Cam- 
bridge, but was ordered to the drier climate of the Northwest 
for the winter. He went to Minnesota, and established himself 
in Faribault. The lung disease, from which he had suffered 
so many years, was followed by an affection of the heart ; and, 
on the 9th of February, 1869, he suddenly fell dead from his 
chair. 

ROBERT THAXTER EDES. — Born in Eastport, Me., 
Sept. 23, 1838; son of Richard Sullivan and Mary (Cushing) 
Edes. After graduation, he spent three years in the study of 
medicine in Boston, and other places ; receiving the degree 
of M. D. from Harvard College, in July, 1861. He applied for 
the position of assistant surgeon in the Massachusetts Volun- 
teers ; but accepted a similar place in the navy, Sept. 10. 
He decided to offer himself for the regular service ; and, after 
examination, was appointed, Sept. 30, and ordered to the 
Naval Hospital, Brooklyn. In December, he was ordered to 
the mortar flotilla, under command of Admiral Porter, then 
fitting out at Brooklyn. His vessel, the flag-ship of one of 
the divisions, sailed in February, and had a share in the bom- 



28 

bardment of Fort Jackson, under Admiral Farragut. His 
commission as assistant surgeon, dated Jan. 26, 1862, reached 
him about this time. The flotilla went, up the river to Vicks- 
burg, and took part in the siege of that place. He was trans- 
ferred to the Black Hawk in August, 1863. He remained on 
this vessel until July, 1864, the most noteworthy event in this 
service being a share in the Red River campaign. On July 
14, he was ordered to the Naval Hospital at Chelsea, where 
he remained until May 13, 1865, having in the mean time 
passed his examination, and received a recommendation for 
promotion. His rank of passed assistant surgeon dates from 
May 8, 1865. He was ordered to the Colorado, flag-ship of 
the European squadron, on May 13 ; but, having waited only 
to be notified of promotion to send in his resignation, his con- 
nection with that vessel was very short. His resignation was 
accepted June i, 1865. He sailed for Germany, Aug. 26, and 
spent some time in medical study in Vienna and Paris. He 
returned to Boston in February, 1866, and began practice in 
Dorchester, but removed to Hingham, June 26, 1866. He 
married, April 30, 1867, Elizabeth Townsend, daughter of 
Calvin W. and Anna K. Clark, of Boston. He received 
the prize offered by the Medical Association for the best 
essay on "Nature in Disease." In May, 1869, he received 
from the New York Academy of Medicine the O'Reilly prize 
of $600, for an essay on the " Sympathetic Nervous System." 
About the same time he removed from Hingham to Roxbury. 
In 1870, he was appointed Assistant Professor of Materia 
Medica in Harvard University, and, in 1875, full professor 
of the same. He is a member of the Boston Natural His- 
tory Society, and of the American Academy of Arts and 
Sciences. His wife, Elizabeth Townsend (Clark), died Dec. 
7, 1877, leaving four children : Anne Balch, born May 2, 
1868; Richard Edward, born Oct. 26, 1869; Elizabeth Town- 
send, born Sept. 23, 1871 ; and Mary Thaxter, born Feb. 8, 
1876. He married, Dec. 20, 1881, Anna C, daughter of Wm. 



29 

H. Richardson, of Dorchester. Removed to Boston in 1882. 
Was appointed Jackson Professor of Clinical Medicine in 1884. 
Was visiting physician at the City Hospital for several years. 
In September, 1886, having resigned his professorship in the 
Medical School and his connection with the City Hospital, he 
removed with his family to Washington, D. C, where he re- 
sides, and is engaged in active practice. He has become a 
member of the Philosophical Society of Washington, and of 
the Medical Society of the District of Columbia. Published 
in 1883, "Therapeutic Handbook of the U. S. Pharmaco- 
poeia " ; in 1887, a book on Therapeutics and Materia Medica. 
Has made various contributions to medical periodicals, and 
is also the author of two articles in Pepper's " American Sys- 
tem of Medicine," Vols. IV. and V. His son is an under- 
graduate at Johns Hopkins University. Address, 12 16 
Eighteenth Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

*SAMUEL HENRY EELLS. — Born in Oberlin, O., 
Aug. 19, 1836; son of James Henry and Maria A. (Fletcher) 
Eells. After graduation, he went to Detroit, Mich., to re- 
side in the family of his guardian, G. N. Fletcher, Esq., and 
began the study of medicine with Dr. C. H. Barrett. He 
also attended the medical lectures of Michigan University, 
at Ann Arbor, during the winter of 1860-61. He never 
received the degree of M. D., not having completed the full 
course of study. He was appointed hospital steward in the 
Twelfth Michigan Volunteers, then in camp at Niles, Feb. 7, 
1862. In March, the regiment was sent South, and shared 
in the battle of Shiloh, where Eells was taken prisoner with 
the regimental hospital. He was held only a few days, there 
being an agreement between the surgeons on both sides 
that the wounded in the joint hospitals should be allowed to 
return to their respective camps on recovery, and their hos- 
pital attendants with them. The regiment was soon attached 
to General McClernand's division of the reserve, and employed 



30 

in guard duty at various points on the railroad lines, chiefly 
at Bolivar, Tenn. He received a commission as assistant 
surgeon of his regiment, Feb. i, 1863. Early in June, it was 
ordered to join the army collected before Vicksburg, and was 
stationed at Snyder's Bluff until the fall of Vicksburg, July 4, 
1863. The regiment was next attached to the expedition 
sent up the Big Black River. The country and the season 
were both perilous, and Eells probably contracted his disease 
by exposure at this time. In August, he joined General 
Steele's expedition into Arkansas, and suffered much from 
chills and fever and ulcerated sore throat. He remained at 
Little Rock until Dec. i, then returned to Detroit on sick 
leave. When he reached home he could not speak above a 
whisper; and, though he seemed to improve at first ^ his 
lungs were soon found to be seriously affected, and he rapidly 
lost strength. He died of bronchial consumption^ at his 
uncle's house in Detroit, Jan. 31, 1864. 

*PAUL MITCHELL ELIOT. —Born in New Bedford, 
Sept. 13, 1837; son of Thomas Dawes and Frances L. 
(Brock) Eliot. His life in college served only to strengthen 
his taste for business pursuits, and, immediately after gradu- 
ation, he went to St. Louis to seek an entrance into commer- 
cial life. In January, 1859, ^^ entered the counting-room of 
the Atlantic Mills Company, where he remained one year. 
He then entered the store of Messrs. F. B. Chamberlain & 
Co. While in their employ, in the summer of i860, he was 
affected by a sunstroke, from which he never recovered. In 
November of that year, he left St. Louis on account of his 
health, and after spending the winter in Washington, where 
his father was attending Congress, he returned to New Bed- 
ford in March, 1861. His brain became affected by the 
disease under which he was laboring, and he was placed in 
a private hospital in New York, and died there Nov. 26, 
1862. 



31 

CHARLES FAIRCHILD. — Born in Cleveland, O., 
April lo, 1838; son of Jairus C. and Sally (Blair) Fairchild. 
After graduation, he began the study of the law in Madison, 
Wis. He was appointed clerk of the Circuit Court, Jan. i, 
i860. He entered the office of Messrs. Palmer & Stark, in 
Milwaukee, in January, 1861. In April of the same year, at 
the breaking out of the Rebellion, he joined the First Wis- 
consin Regiment, and served with it in Maryland as ensign 
and first lieutenant. The term of service of the regiment 
expired Aug. 17, 1861, and he returned to his home. He 
was in the employ of Messrs. Fairchild & O'Connor, Wood 
County, Wis., till March 5, 1862, when he received the 
appointment of acting assistant paymaster in the navy, with 
orders to the gunboat Mahaska. His vessel served in the 
James River and neighborhood till August, 1863, when it was 
attached to the South Atlantic squadron, and shared in the 
operations before Charleston. He was appointed assistant 
paymaster in the regular service, June 30, 1864, and resigned 
Dec. 6, 1864. He entered the Harvard Law School in the 
spring of 1865, and left it at the close of the next winter 
term. He returned to the West, and in January, 1866, was 
appointed secretary to his brother, then elected governor of 
Wisconsin. In December, 1866, he came to Boston, and 
entered the employment of S. D. Warren, Esq., paper man- 
ufacturer. He took the degree of A. M. in 1867. He be- 
came a partner in the firm of S. D. Warren & Co., dealers 
in paper, Jan. i, 1871. He was married, Aug, 20, 1868, 
to Elizabeth E. Nelson, daughter of the Hon. Albert H. 
Nelson, of Boston, and has seven children : Sally, born 
June 17, 1869; Lucia, born Dec. 6, 1870; Charles Nel- 
son, born March 8, 1872; John Cummings, born March 7, 
1874 ; Blair, born June 23, 1877 ; Nelson, born Sept. 22, 
1879; and Gordon, born Jan. 31, 1882. Retired from the 
firm of S. D. Warren & Co., Sept. i, 1880, and entered the 
firm of Lee, Higginson & Co., bankers, on the same day. 



32 

Continues to be a member of that firm. Address, 44 State 
Street, Boston. 

WILLIAM ELIOT FETTE. — Born in St. Louis, Mo., 
Feb. II, 1839; son of Henry G. and Margaret M. (Daven- 
port) Fette. He opened a school for boys, Sept. 20, 1858, 
in the building in the rear of Beacon Hill Place, Boston. 
He removed to a room in Allston Hall at the expiration 
of the second year, and remained there one year. Dur- 
ing all this time, his residence was in Cambridge ; but in 
October, 1861, his family removed to Boston, and he trans- 
ferred his school to their new residence in Boylston Place. 
Here, he remained five years, and gradually raised the grade 
of his school from an intermediate to a classical school. In 
October, 1867, he removed both school and residence to No. 
42 Hancock Street, and changed the name of the former to 
West End Latin School. In May, 1868, he again removed 
the school to No. 24 Charles Street ; the preparatory depart- 
ment remaining in Hancock Street. He took the degree of 
A. M. in 1862. He was married, April 15, 1875, in Newark, 
N. J., to Eliza Heyer, daughter of the Rev. Abraham Polhe- 
mus, D. D. In June, 1875, he disposed of his school, and, in 
October of the same year, went to Europe, where he spent 
two years in travelling, and where, in Zurich, Switzerland, 
his daughter, Margaret Davenport, was born, June 13, 1876. 
In 1870 and 1871, he published two series of "Dialogues 
from Dickens." Went to Europe in 1885 for needed rest, 
with his family. His residence and address. No. 1 1 Walnut 
Street, Boston. 

HENRY WILDER FOOTE. — Born in Salem, June 2, 
1838; son of Caleb and Mary W. (White) Foote. After 
some little time devoted to regaining his health, which had 
suffered from a severe illness during the most of our Senior 
year, he entered the Cambridge Divinity School in October, 



33 

1858. From this he was graduated in course in July, 1861. 
After preaching in several places in the West, and declining 
an invitation to be settled as minister of the Stone Church in 
Portsmouth, N. H., he accepted, in November, a call to King's 
Chapel, Boston, and was ordained its minister Dec. 22, 1861. 
He took the degree of A. M. at the Commencement of that 
year. He was married, July 9, 1863, to Frances A., daughter 
of the late Hon. Samuel A. and Mary (Lyman) Eliot. His 
daughter Mary was born Nov. 6, 1864. He remained con- 
stantly at his post in Boston, until he took a nine-months' 
vacation, passed in travelling in Europe ; sailing from Bos- 
ton, Feb. 13, 1867, and returning Nov. 9. A twin son and 
daughter were born Feb. 2, 1875, Henry Wilder and Frances 
Eliot. A daughter, Dorothea, was born Nov. 3, 1880. His 
daughter Mary died Dec. 10, 1885. He was in Europe for 
his health from May to December, 1878, visiting Spain, 
Greece, Constantinople, Palestine, and Egypt. Returned, 
still quite out of health with an affection of the throat, and 
spent the spring of 1879 at Aiken, S. C, where his children 
were dangerously ill, and his return to his duties was post- 
poned till September. He is still rector of King's Chapel, 
Boston. He is a member of the Massachusetts Historical 
Society, of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, 
and the American Antiquarian Society of Worcester. He 
is the author of the "Annals of King's Chapel," Vol. I. of 
which was published in 1882, and Vol. H. is now in press. In 
1887 was published the "Two Hundredth Anniversary of 
King's Chapel, Boston," containing some historical sermons, 
and he has published other occasional sermons. Address, 25 
Brimmer Street, Boston. 

WILLIAM HENRY FOX.— Born in Taunton, Aug. 29, 
1837; son of Henry H. and Sarah A. (Burt) Fox. From 
graduation until i860, he was teacher of the academy at 
Myricksville, and engaged in reading law. In i860, he en- 



34 

tered the office of Judge Bennett, in Taunton, and remained 
there until Sept. 17, i86r, when he was admitted to the 
bar. He was elected commissioner of insolvency for Bristol 
County, Nov. 4, 1862. Governor Andrew appointed him 
special justice of the Taunton Police Court, May 11, 1863. 
After this court was abolished, he was made trial justice at 
Taunton, in May, 1864. He was appointed principal justice 
of the new Municipal Court in Taunton, Dec. 16, 1864. This 
court went into operation, Jan. 4, 1865. He married, Oct. 6, 
1864, Anna M., daughter of James H. and Harriet M. An- 
thony, of Taunton. He was elected Mayor of that city in 
December, 1872, and served one year. He was appointed, 
July I, 1874, Justice of the First District Court of Bristol 
County, which office he still holds. His children are William 
Yale, born June 26, 1865 ; Marion, born April 12, 1870; and 
Francis Bird, born Jan. 27, 1876. He took his degree of 
A.M. in 1 87 1. He is one of the Trustees of the Wheaton 
Female Seminary, of the Taunton Public Library, and of the 
Bristol County Savings Bank, being also Vice-President of 
the last-named institution. Address, Taunton, Mass. 

GEORGE EBENEZER FRANCIS. — Born in Lowell, 
May 29, 1838; son of James B. and Sarah W. (Brownell) 
Francis. After graduation, he entered the office of the 
Brooklyn City Water Works, and remained there about one 
year, when he began the study of medicine at the Chelsea 
Marine Hospital and the Harvard Medical School. From 
June 16 to Sept. i, 1 861, he was volunteer assistant surgeon 
at Fortress Monroe. Upon his return home, he re-entered 
the Medical School ; and in May, 1862, he was appointed 
one of the house surgeons at the Massachusetts General 
Hospital. In August, 1862, after the battle of Cedar Moun- 
tain, he was sent by Surgeon-General Dale to Culpeper, as 
volunteer surgeon to the Massachusetts regiments. His ser- 
vices were not found necessary, and he was made contract 



35 

surgeon at General Banks's headquarters. He was in Pope's 
retreat, and at the battle of Antietam, and returned home in 
October. He received his degree of M. D. in March, 1863, 
and was appointed acting assistant surgeon in the navy, May 
15. He served in the West, chiefly on the Mississippi River 
and at Cairo. He was ordered to the Ouichita, a large iron- 
clad in the Mississippi River squadron, Jan. 3, 1864. He 
came home on a short furlough immediately afterwards. At 
the expiration of his leave, he joined his vessel, and shared 
in the Red River campaigns. He resigned his commission, 
Oct. 28, 1865, having just settled to the practice of his pro- 
fession in Worcester. He was married, June 23, 1868, to 
Rebecca Newton, daughter of Frank Harrison and Eliza- 
beth (Parker) Kinnicutt, of Worcester. Continues to prac- 
tise medicine in Worcester. His daughter, Elizabeth, was 
born Aug. 14, 1869. His son, George Kinnicutt, was born 
Nov. 24, 1 87 1, and died Dec. 20, 1877. He took his degree 
of A. M. in 1872. Has been elected to membership in vari- 
ous State and city medical societies ; and is a member of 
the American Antiquarian Society and the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society. Becoming interested in photography, 
he has been a member of various societies connected with 
that art, especially of the Worcester Camera Club, of which 
he has been President since its organization in 1885. Is 
Visiting Surgeon to the Worcester City Hospital. Address, 
79 Elm Street, Worcester. 

HENRY WALKER FROST. —Born in Concord, April 
29, 1838 ; son of Barzillai and Elmira (Stone) Frost. In 
September, 1858, he began the study of the law in the offices 
of Judge Hoar, in Concord and Boston. He attended the 
lectures of the Harvard Law School in 1859-60. In June 
of the latter year he gained the Bowdoin prize for resident 
graduates, with a dissertation on " The Various Tenures on 
which Land is held in Different Countries, considered as 



36 

affecting the Economical and Political Condition of the 
People." In November, i860, he entered the office of 
Messrs. Hazelton & Ware, No. 81 Washington Street, Bos- 
ton, and was admitted to the Suffolk bar, Sept. 11, 1861. 
He edited the "United States Digest " for 1865, 1866, and 
1867. Continues the practice of his profession. His address 
is No. 40 State Street, Boston. 

* SIMON GREENLEAF FULLER. — Born in Andover, 
Sept. II, 1838; son of Samuel and Charlotte K. (Greenleaf) 
Fuller. In October, 1858, he entered the General Theological 
Seminary of the Episcopal Church in New York. After 
spending a year in study there, he removed to the Berkeley 
School at Middletown, Conn., of which his father was then 
elected a professor. He was ordained deacon by Bishop 
Williams at Middletown, May 22, 1861. He was married, 
the next day, to Celeste Parmalee, daughter of the late Rev. 
William Bostwick, of Flushing, L. I. On June 8, he was 
invited to the rectorship of St. Matthew's Church, Wilton, 
Conn., and began his work there immediately. He was 
ordained priest, Sept. 12, 1862. He accepted the rectorship 
of Trinity Church, Hartford, Conn., Nov. 16, 1863. He 
became rector of St. Peter's Church, Pittsburgh, at Easter, 
1865, and resigned at Easter, 1868, on account of the ill 
health of his family. Soon afterwards, he accepted a call to 
St. James's Church, Birmingham, Conn. During his resi- 
dence in the diocese of Pittsburgh, he was a member of the 
standing committee, and was also deputy elect to the Gen- 
eral Convention. Two children are living : Henry Riley, 
born June 16, 1862; William Bostwick, born Jan. 29, 1864. 
A daughter, Theodora, was born Jan. 11, 1866, but died Feb. 
24 of the same year. He resigned St. James's Church, 
Birmingham, Conn., in December, 1869, and accepted a call 
to Yonkers, N. Y. From that place he removed to Syracuse, 
N. Y., in March, 1871, and took charge of St. Paul's Church. 



Here, on the 2rst November, 1872, he was suddenly stricken 
down by apoplexy. A volume of sermons, to which is pre- 
fixed a memorial address by Bishop Huntington, was pub- 
lished soon after his death. His son Henry is a successful 
teacher and composer of music, while the younger son, Wil- 
liam, was, in 1885, an undergraduate of Syracuse University. 

* ROBERT BRUCE GELSTON.— Born in Baltimore, 
Md., Nov. 17, 1837; son of Hugh and Rebecca (Durham) 
Gelston. Soon after leaving Cambridge, he entered the law 
office of his brother-in-law, Hon. Isaac D, Jones, of Princess 
Anne, on the eastern shore of Maryland. Two years or more 
spent there enabled him to pass a successful examination, and 
he was admitted to the bar, Dec. 5, r86i. In the winter of 
1862-63, he was very much troubled by asthma, and only re- 
covered to be prostrated by intense neuralgia. All that the 
highest medical skill and the attentive nursing of a beloved 
mother and sister could do was unavailing to relieve the vio- 
lent headache from which he suffered almost constantly. His 
sight became seriously impaired by the progress of the dis- 
ease. In the summer of 1865, he grew better, and, with his 
mother, visited Sharon and Saratoga Springs ; but the respite 
was short, the acute pain returned, and after a few months 
he sank under the disease. He died in Baltimore, Jan. 3, 
1866. 

HORATIO JAMES GILBERT.— Born in Taunton, July 
3, 18,37; son of Horatio and Cordelia E. (Perry) Gilbert. In 
December, 1858, he entered the counting-room of Messrs. 
Morton Grinnell & Co., Park Place, New York, where he re- 
mained until 1862, when he came to Boston, and entered the 
hardware business. In the spring of 1867, he made a short 
visit to Europe, and also in 1^77. Became a member of 
the firm of Dodge, Gilbert & Co., from which he retired in 
March, 1883. He married, June 9, 1879, Ellen :fc;:J8.. Buttrick. 

X 



38 

Children: Helen Cordelia, born May 26, 1880; Margaret, 
born Feb. 19, 1883, died March 13, 1883 ; Horatio, born 
March 26, 1885 ; and Charles Theodore, born Aug. 2, 1887. 
Address, Milton, Mass. 

*OZIAS GOODWIN.— Born in Boston, Sept. 30, 1837; 
son of Ozias and Lucy N. (Chapman) Goodwin. After grad-- 
uation, he entered the law office of J. A. Loring, Esq., Bos- 
ton. In August, 1862, he was appointed second lieutenant in 
the Second Massachusetts Regiment ; but owing to the 
deaths of his father and brother {Captain Goodwin, killed at 
the battle of Cedar Mountain), he was forced to decline the 
commission. In November of the same year, he sailed for 
Europe, returning in September, 1864. He sailed again in 
April, 1865, and returned in September. He sailed for the 
third time in December, 1865, and returned in September, 
1866. From that time he resided in Boston till his death, 
Jan. 17, 1878. 

WILLIAM GILCHRIST GORDON.— Born in New 
Bedford, Nov. 16, 1836; son of William A. and Maria (Wil- 
liams) Gordon. In September, 1858, he began teaching as 
an assistant in the Taunton High School, and in February, 
1859, w^s appointed principal of the Bristol Academy in the 
same place. He resigned this position in February, 1864, and 
removed to New Bedford, where he began the study of medi- 
cine with his father. In the spring of 1865, he taught in the 
New Bedford High School. He removed to Springfield, 
Mass., and opened a school for girls, in September of that 
year. He enlarged his school, and made arrangements for 
taking boys as well as girls about a year afterwards. During 
his residence in Taunton, he was an officer of various town 
libraries, etc., and while he lived in Springfield, was secretary 
of the Scientific Association there, and an active member of 
the Hampden County Teachers' Association, before which he 



39 

read a paper on " School Discipline," in June, 1867. He was 
married May 11, 1861, in Taunton, to Sarah Otis, daughter 
of Otis and Ann B. Storrs, of Taunton. He has had children : 
Mabel, born Feb. 19, 1865 ; Helen, born June 22, 1867 ; Wil- 
liam Alexander, born July 28, 1871. A daughter, Alice, was 
born Feb. 17, 1869, and died July 26, of the same year. He 
continued his school in Springfield, Mass., until the summer 
of 1871, In October of that year, he sailed for Europe with 
his family and a few pupils, and resided in Leipsic and Dres- 
den. He returned to this country in March, 1873, to take 
charge of the opening and working of a sandstone quarry in 
Nova Scotia. He was engaged in this work two years, spend- 
ing each winter in New Bedford. In April, 1875, he removed 
to Iowa, and opened a private school for boys and girls in 
Burlington, which was successful. He was offered the Latin 
professorship in Griswold College, Iowa, in July, 1877, but 
declined it. He resides at No. 816 Warren Street, Burling- 
ton, Iowa. His daughter Mabel was married to Mr. Frank 
Ashley Millard, Sept. 21, 1887. In November, 1884, he be- 
came assistant auditor of the treasury in the Chicago, Bur- 
lington and Quincy Railroad Company at Chicago, which 
position he still holds. Address, Chicago, Burlington and 
Quincy Railroad, Treasurer's ofifice, Chicago, 111. 

SAMUEL SWETT GREEN. — Born in Worcester, Feb. 
20, 1837 ; son of James and Elizabeth (Swett) Green. After 
graduation, he returned to his home in Worcester, where ill 
health prevented him from undertaking work of any kind. 
In June, 1859, ^^ sailed for Smyrna and Constantinople in 
the bark Race Horse, returning in November. In Sep- 
tember, 1S60, he entered the Cambridge Divinity School, but 
ill health forced him to leave at the end of the second month. 
He returned to the school in September, 1861, and was 
graduated in July, 1864. After preaching a few times, he 
gave up the ministry on account of his health, and in Decem- 



40 

ber, 1864, went into the Mechanics' Bank, Worcester, as 
book-keeper. He was made teller in the Worcester National 
Bank, Aug. 15, 1865, and resigned his place May 22, 1868. 
He was elected a member of the board of directors of the 
Worcester Free Public Library, Jan. i, 1867, and in April of 
the same year was chosen treasurer of the Worcester Lyceum 
and Natural History Association. He took his degree of 
A. M. at the Commencement of 1870 In January, 1871, he 
was chosen librarian of the Free Public Library of Worces- 
ter, Mass., which position he still holds. He published, in 
1876, an historical and descriptive account of the library, 
and, in the same year, a pamphlet entitled " The Desirable- 
ness of establishing Personal Intercourse and Relations 
between Librarians and Readers in Popular Libraries." This 
was an essay read at the Conference of Librarians, held 
in Philadelphia, October, 1876. In 1877, he visited England 
as a delegate to the International Conference of Librari- 
ans, held in London, Oct. 2-5. He was a member of the 
council of this conference. He is one of the Executive 
Committee of the American Library Association, and was a 
member of the committee chosen by the overseers to visit 
the library of Harvard College. His health has been good 
for the last fifteen years, during which time he has been 
engaged in forming and carrying out plans to improve methods 
of administration in public libraries, and particularly in de- 
monstrating the fact that it is possible to build up a very 
large popular use of libraries for purposes of reference and 
study ; on which and kindred subjects he has published many 
pamphlets, books, and newspaper articles, and delivered 
several addresses. It has been gratifying to find that very 
important results have followed from these labors in different 
portions of the United States and of Great Britain. Atten- 
tion has also been called to them in an official report of the 
Prefecture of the Seine, France. A portion of almost every 
day has been devoted by him, since leaving the Divinity 



41 

School, to study of the special subjects in which he became 
interested in the Divinity School, or to historical investiga- 
tion and reading. Since Oct. 15, 1879, has been chairman of 
American Library Association's Committee on Finance. 
June 28, 1877, chosen honorary member of the Phi Beta Kappa 
Society, Alpha Chapter of Massachusetts. July, 1878, chosen 
an honorary member of the Library Association of the United 
Kingdom, May 8, 1879, elected a fellow of the Royal tMut^c^aJC 
Society of Great Britain. April 28, 1880, elected a member 
of the American Antiquarian Society. Oct. 12, 1882, made 
a trustee of Leicester Academy. Member of the Committee 
of the Education Department of the American Social Science 
Association since September, 1880. Chosen a member of 
the Council of the American Antiquarian Society in October, 
1883 ; and a member of the American Historical Associa- 
tion in October 1884. In June, 1886, chosen first president 
of the Worcester High School Association, and president of 
the Worcester Indian Association. In 1886, appointed 
lecturer on public libraries as popular educational institu- 
tions, in the School of Library Economy connected with 
Columbia College, New York City, and has delivered lectures 
in 1887 and 1888. In 1887, chosen vice-president of the 
Worcester Art Society. In September, 1887, chosen first 
vice-president of the American Library Association. Address' 
Worcester, Mass. 

JAMES STEVENSON HALL. — Born in Troy, N. Y., 
Aug. 9, 1835 ; son of Daniel and Augusta (Fitch) Hall. After 
graduation, he returned to Troy, N.Y., and studied law in the 
office of Messrs. Seymour & Sandford. He is still living 
in Troy, N. Y. 

ALFRED STEDMAN HARTWELL. — Born in West 
Dedham, June 11, 1836; son of Stedman and Rebecca D. 
(Perry) Hartwell. After graduation, he was tutor in the 



42 

Washington University of St. Louis until May, iS6\, when he 
enlisted as corporal in Company K, Third Regiment, Missouri 
Reserve Corps. At the expiration of his three-months term 
of service, he came to Cambridge, and entered the Harvard 
Law School. He was appointed first lieutenant in the Forty- 
fourth Massachusetts, Aug. 22, 1862. This was a nine- 
months regiment, and served in North Carolina. He was 
commissioned captain in the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts, 
March 16, 1863, and lieutenant-colonel in the Fifty-fifth Mas- 
sachusetts, May 30. With this regiment he went to South 
Carolina, and was commissioned its colonel, Nov. 3, 1863. He 
was brevetted brigadier-general United States Volunteers, 
Dec. 30, 1864, for good conduct in battle of Honey Hill, S. C. 
He served in that State and in Florida, and after General Lee's 
surrender, was placed in command of one of the interior dis- 
tricts of South Carolina. He was mustered out of service, 
April 30, 1866. During the next summer, he was engaged in 
planting cotton on Edisto Island ; but in September, he re- 
turned to Cambridge, accepted a proctorship in the college, 
and re-entered the Law School. He was a member of the 
State Legislature from Natick in 1866-67. He was admitted 
to the bar, Feb. 18, 1867, and opened an office in Boston, in 
Court Square, removing, in the spring of 1868, to No. 15 
Pemberton Square. He accepted the position of first associate 
justice of the Supreme Court of the Hawaiian Islands in June, 
1868, which position he held for several years, and on his re- 
tiring from the bench, became Attorney-General, which office 
he held till July, 1878, after which time he practised law in 
Honolulu. Spent six months in California in 1883, and, Sept. 
I, 1885, brought his family to his old home in South Natick, 
Mass., and stayed in Boston and vicinity for two years, re- 
turning to Honolulu in November, 1887, where he is again in 
his former home and law offices, and full of law work. He mar- 
ried, Jan. 10, 1872, Charlotte Smith, of Kolon, daughter of Dr. 
James W. Smith, and has children : Mabel, Edith, Madeline, 



43 

Charlotte, Juliette, Charles, Bernica, and Dorothy. His ad- 
dress is Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands. 

ALFRED HOUSTON HAVEN. — Born in Portsmouth, 
N.H., April 26, 1836; son of Alfred Woodward and Margaret 
(Houston) Haven. He left college at the end of the Junior 
year, but received his degree as a member of our class in 1867, 
and his Master's degree in 1870. In March, 1858, he began 
the study of medicine at the Harvard Medical School, where he 
received the degree of M. D. in July, i86r. In February, 1862, 
he entered the United States service as acting assistant sur- 
geon, and was assigned to duty in hospitals at Washington. 
In July, 1862, he was appointed surgeon in charge of Judi- 
ciary Square General Hospital, in Washington. In 1863, he 
was appointed post surgeon at Artillery Camp Marshall, 
Washington ; and in January, 1864, surgeon in charge of one 
the general hospitals of the Second Division, at Alexandria, 
Va. He was appointed pathologist of Fairfax Seminary Gen- 
eral Hospital, near Alexandria (1,500 patients), in 1864. At 
various times he was a member of boards of examination for 
the Invalid Corps and for discharge from the army. By the 
Secretary of War he was commissioned assistant surgeon of 
the Thirty-fifth Regiment United States Colored Troops, in 
August, 1865. He served in and near Charleston, and was 
also in charge of the hospital at Summerville, S C, until June, 
1866, when the regiment was mustered out. He was in the 
United States service nearly four years and a half. After 
leaving the army, he practised his profession in New York 
City. In 1 87 1, he was appointed by the Commissioners of 
Charities of New York, physician in charge of one of the 
children's hospitals on Randall's Island, East River, which 
position he resigned after a year's service. He has contrib- 
uted articles to the medical journals of New York, and to 
various magazines. For several years he has lived in Maiden, 
Mass. Letters addressed to him at Portsmouth, N. H., will 
be forwarded to him. 



44 

* MARCUS MORTON HAWES. — Born in New Bed- 
ford, Sept. 23, 1836. After settling his father's business 
affairs, he entered the firm of Messrs. Fletcher & Hawes, 
dealers in flour, Boston, in November, 1859. The style of the 
firm was changed to Fletcher, Hawes & Co., in January, 1861. 
He was commissioned first lieutenant in the Second Mas- 
sachusetts Volunteers, May 28, 186 1 ; captain and assistant 
quartermaster, July 17, 1862 ; and brigade quartermaster, July 
21. He resigned Feb. 25, 1865. After the close of the war, 
he went into business in New Orleans. He was married in 
Baltimore, Md., in 1870, and died in that city, July 3, 1880, 
of Bright's disease He left no children. 

DANIEL HOLBROOK. —Born in Boston, Jan. 20, 1837; 
son of Daniel and Melinda (Holden) Holbrook. After gradua- 
tion, he entered the oflfice of Messrs. C. T. & T. H. Russell, 
State Street, Boston, and began the study of the law. He 
abandoned this after six months to take charge of the academy 
at Monticelio, Sullivan County, N. Y. In 1860-62, he was 
private tutor in the family of C, Thomas, Esq., Shohola, Penn. 
He next taught in the House of Refuge school at Randall's 
Island, N. Y. He took charge of the Tri-States Union news 
paper, at Port Jervis, N. Y., Oct. r, 1862, which, after pub- 
lishing it for seven years, he sold in 1869. ^^ ^^^"^ engaged 
in the insurance and real-estate business in Port Jervis ; the 
insurance was soon abandoned, and -the real-estate business 
retained, in which he is now engaged. In i87i,hewas elected 
a justice of the peace on the Republican ticket, which office 
he has held ever since. He was elected one of the justices of 
sessions of the county of Orange in 1885. Has been secre- 
tary and treasurer of the Republican County Committee for 
some time. He was married, April 29, 1863, to Frances, 
daughter of Job and Mary Lockwood, of Boston. He had one 
child, Maud, born Jan. 19, 1864, who died within the year. 
Address, Port Jervis, N. Y. 



45 

JOHN ROMANS. —Born in Boston, Nov. 26, 1836; son 
of John and Caroline (Walker) Homans. Immediately after 
graduation he began the study of medicine at the Harvard 
Medical School, and took his degree of M. D., March, 1862. 
For some time previous he had been one of the house surgeons 
at the Massachusetts General Hospital. He received a com- 
mission as assistant surgeon in the regular navy, Jan. 24, 
1862, and was ordered to the Aroostook. This vessel 
served on the James River, and shared in the attack on Fort 
Darling, the battle of Malvern Hill, etc. Upon going to- 
Washington for repairs, in September, Homans, weary of the 
monotony of the naval service, and disappointed in the amount 
of surgical practice, resigned ; and, after passing the usual 
examination, was commissioned assistant surgeon in the army,^ 
Nov. 22, 1862. He was ordered to report to General Banks 
at New Orleans. During the summer and autumn of 1863,. 
he was in charge of St. James's Hospital in that city. In 
March, 1864, he shared in the Red River expedition as assist- 
ant medical director, on the staff of General Banks, and dur- 
ing a portion of the time performed the duties of medical 
director, owing 10 the absence of that officer. In July, 1864^ 
he came to Virginia with the Nineteenth Army Corps, and 
served in the Shenandoah Valley under General Sheridan as 
surgeon -in-chief of the Nineteenth Corps. He was placed on 
General Sheridan's staff as medical inspector of the middle 
division in November, and served in that capacity until his 
resignation. May 28, 1865. In August of that year, he sailed 
for Europe, and studied in Vienna, Paris, and London, return- 
ing in November, 1866, when he began to practise his profes- 
sion in Boston. He is a member of the Society of Natural 
History, Boston Medical Association, Medical Benevolent 
Society, Boston Society for Medical Observation, etc., etc. 
He married, Dec. 4, 1872, Helen Amory, daughter of William 
Perkins, Esq., of Boston, and has six children : Robert, born 
Oct. 3, 1873 ; Katherine Amory, born Feb. 13, 1875 J John 



46 

Alden, born Sept. 2, 1877 ; Marian Jackson, born Aug. 21, 
1881 ; Helen, born Jan. 26, 1884; and William Perkins, born 
Jan. 12, 1887. He continues to practise surgery in Boston; 
most of his work being in the line of abdominal surgery, a 
comparatively new branch of surgical practice. He has been 
surgeon to the Carney Hospital, to the Children's Hospital, 
to out-patients at the Massachusetts General Hospital, and 
visiting surgeon to the Massachusetts General Hospital ; and 
is now surgeon to the Massachusetts General Hospital, con- 
sulting surgeon to the Children's Hospital, medical inspector 
of the Perkins Institution for the Blind, medical examiner of 
the New England Mutual Life Insurance Company, and 
University lecturer in the Harvard Medical School on ovarian 
tumors. He has a private hospital or nursing home at 15 
Louisburg Square. He has published many articles on 
abdominal surgery in the British and American medical jour- 
nals ; and in 1887, a book entitled "Three hundred and 
eighty-four Laparotomies for Various Diseases." In the sum- 
mer of 1887, went to Europe for a few weeks, and walked 
through Switzerland with his oldest son, Robert. Address, 
161 Beacon Street, Boston. 

*HOLLIS HUNNEWELL. — Born in Boston, Nov. 16, 
1836; son of Horatio Hollis and Isabella Pratt (Welles) 
Hunnewell. After graduation, he went into the law oilfice of 
E. S. Rand, Esq., Boston. In September, 1859, he went to 
Europe, and spent some time in Constantinople as attache to 
the French embassy. He returned to this country in Novem- 
ber, i860, and entered the Harvard Law School. In 1861, he 
went into business with his father in Boston. He made an- 
other visit to Europe in 1866, sailing in March, and returning 
in November. He married, April 30, 1867, Louisa, daughter 
of Frederick Bronson, Esq., of New York. He had a son, 
Hollis Horatio, born Feb. 10, 1868; and a daughter, Charlotte 
Bronson, born Oct. 13, 1871. He continued to reside in 



47 

Boston and Wellesley, and died in Wellesley, after a long 
illness, June 1 1, 1S84. 

WILLIAM ARTHUR KILBOURN. — Born in Groton, 
July 16, 1838; son of Jeremiah and Patty (Flint) Kilbourn. 
In September, 1858, he accepted the mastership of the High 
School in Framingham, and remained there until November, 
1863, when he became principal of the Lancaster Academy. 
He married, April 7, 1862, Ellen Livingston, of Keene, 
N. H. He had two children by her : Robert Burrage, born 
April 29, 1863; Ellen Livingston, born Oct. 22, 1865. He 
was married, March 14, 1871, to Abby Fletcher, daughter of 
Jonas Goss, of Lancaster, and has by her, Martha, born Dec. 
8, 1871 ; Elizabeth, born Dec. 28, 1874; Arthur Goss, born 
Aug. 19, 1876; Mary, born April 25, 1880; Alice, born Jan. 
10, 1882 ; Annie, born Aug. 23, 1883 ; Ruth Burrage, born 
Feb. 23, 1888. He had also a son, William, born Aug. 14, 
1873, who died Feb. 25, 1875. His oldest son and daughter 
are both married, and have each one child. He took his 
degree of A. M. in 1861. He served several years on the 
School Committee of Lancaster, and raised the academy there 
to a high grade of scholarship. He continued to be princi- 
pal of the Lancaster Academy until it was merged into a 
town high school. Since 1874, he has been in charge of the 
Thayer farm at South Lancaster. Address, South Lancaster, 
Mass. 

* EDWARD HARRINGTON KIMBALL. —Born in 
Bradford, Jan. 6, 1835 ; son of David C. Kimball. During 
the winter of 1858-59, he taught school in Newington, N. H. 
The next spring he began the study of law in the office of 
Jeremiah Russell, Esq., in Haverhill, Mass. He removed to 
Mississippi in October, 1859, ^^ take charge of an academy 
in Brownsville. In July, 1861, he returned to his home in 
Bradford, and entered the office of J. J. Marsh, Esq., of 



48 

Haverhill. In the spring of 1862, he went to British Columbia, 
where he resided for many years, and was accidentally killed 
there at Barkerville, in February, 1874. He was overwhelmed 
by an avalanche of snow, and thirty men were thirty-eight 
hours in digging through the snow to find his body. He had 
obtained the respect and love of a large number of the people 
of Columbia. 

* ANSEL LAMSON. — Born in Lunenburg, Vt., July 
29, 1834; son of Reuben and Abigail (Goodall) Lamson. 
After graduation, he entered the Harvard Law School, but 
did not remain long. He took the degree of A. M. in 1867. 
He went to the South in 1859, and taught school in Mobile, 
Ala., until the breaking out of the war. He returned North 
in 1 801, and entered the General Theological Seminary 
(Episcopal) in New York. He was graduated, but was never 
ordained to the ministry. He taught in New York while in 
the seminary, and afterward in the Adelphi Institute, Brook- 
lyn. He suffered from some trouble with his knee joint, for 
treatment of which he went to St. Luke's Hospital, where 
an operation was performed, from the effects of which he 
died April 12, 1868. He was never married. 

CHARLES HENRY LEAROYD. — Born in Danvers, 
June 7, 1834; son of John Andrew and Sarah (Silvester) 
Learoyd. The first year after graduation he spent in Cin- 
cinnati, as tutor in the family of Larz Anderson, Esq. He 
entered Andover Theological Seminary in December, 1859. 
He was ordained deacon in the Episcopal Church, July 10, 

1862, and was assistant to the Rev. Dr. Huntington, of 
Emmanuel Church, Boston, during the next winter. In June, 

1863, he received a call to the rectorship of Grace Church, 
Medford, and after being admitted to priest's orders in 
Andover, June 24, took charge of his parish, Sept. 6, 1863. 
He was married in Calvary Church, Danvers, Oct. 14, 1863, 



49 

to Susan Ellen, daughter of Frederick and Almira (Putnam) 
Perley, of Danvers. He spent a year in Europe, sailing in 
September, 1865, and returning to the charge of his parish 
in October, 1866. He took his degree of A. M. at the Com- 
mencement of 1871. Since Easter, 1872, he has been rector 
of St. Thomas's Church, Taunton, Mass. He is treasurer 
of the Diocese of Massachusetts, member of the Board of 
Missions, etc. A son, named John, was born July 13, 1867, 
but lived only five days. A son, Manton, born June 4, 1871, 
died Feb. 7 of the following year. A son, Arthur Sowdon, 
was born Aug. 14, 1S73, and a daughter, Grace, Dec. 13, 
1874, Another son, Charles Henry, was born April 30, 
1878. He spent the summer of 1882 in Europe. He is a 
member of the Old Colony Historical Society, and on the 
executive committee of the Clerical Union of the Diocese of 
Massachusetts. He delivered an historical address (printed 
by request) before the Southern Convocation of Massachu- 
setts at its two hundredth meeting, Jan. 26, 1887. Address, 
Taunton, Mass. 

* JAMES JACKSON LOWELL. — Born in Cambridge, 
Oct. 15, 1837; son of Charles Russell and Anna Cabot 
(Jackson) Lowell. After graduation, he chose the law for a 
profession. He pursued his studies at home, and was en- 
gaged in teaching private pupils until September, i860, when 
he entered the Law School. In June, 1861, with his cousin, 
Wilham L. Putnam, he commenced to enlist men for a com- 
pany of the Nineteenth Massachusetts Regiment, to be com- 
manded by Mr. Schmitt, the instructor in German in the 
college. Orders were soon given transferring the company 
to the Twentieth Massachusetts Regiment, and Lowell was 
commissioned first lieutenant in that regiment, July 10, 1861. 
He was in camp at Poolesville, Md., until the 20th of the fol- 
lowing October. In the battle of Ball's Bluff, Oct. 21, he was 
seriously wounded in the thigh. After recovering from his 



50 

wound at home, he returned to his company, of which he now 
took command, in February, 1862. In March, his regiment 
was transferred to the Peninsula, and took part in McClellan's 
advance upon Richmond. In the battle of Glendale, on the 
afternoon of June 30, 1862, he fell, mortally wounded, having 
been shot in the abdomen while dressing the line of his com- 
pany. He lingered for several days, enduring his pain and 
the approach of death with unwavering courage and resigna- 
tion, and died on July 4. The place of his death was Nel- 
son's or Frazier's Farm, and his remains were buried there 
by a private of his regiment. They were removed from this 
resting-place by affectionate hands, in the autumn of 1865, 
and placed beside those of his brother, General Charles R. 
Lowell, in Mount Auburn. Lowell was rarely gifted in intel- 
lectual and moral qualities. He stood easily first among us 
in scholarship, and his purity and nobility of character, his 
earnestness, his kindliness, made us all love and admire him. 
A brilliant career of usefulness and honor in civil life seemed 
to lie open before him when his patriotism and love of free- 
dom led him to encounter the hardships and dangers of war 
in the service of his country. His memory will always be 
cherished among us with pride and affection. His short life 
was filled with high purposes and noble achievements, and 
was fitly closed by his willing sacrifice of it for the great 
cause to which he had devoted it. He said, among his last 
words, that " he felt that his death was altogether right, and 
hoped they would think so at home." 

THATCHER MAGOUN. — Born in Medford, Sept. 5, 
1838; son of Thatcher and Martha (Tufts) Magoun. Imme- 
diately after graduation he went into the shipping business 
in the office of his father, in Boston. He was admitted a 
partner, and th'e style of the firm changed to Magoun & 
Sons, Jan. i, 1866. He married, Jan. 4, r86o, Harriot Lom- 
bard, daugliter of the late Henry A. Norcross, of New 



51 

Orleans. His first child, a son, was born Feb. i6, 1861, and 
named Thatcher, after his father and grandfather. To this 
boy was duly presented the cradle voted by the class to the 
first of the new generation. His second son, Henry Nor- 
cross, was born Oct. 23, 1862; his daughter, Harriot Martha, 
was born Feb. 3, 1866; son, Arthur, born Jan. 10, 1869; 
daughter, Esther Mary, born Nov. 17, 1879. Lived in Med- 
ford for about twenty years, and then moved to North Pem- 
broke, where he has a large farm. When he moved, he re- 
signed his trusteeship in the Medford Savings Bank, which 
he had held for about fifteen years and from its inception. 
He has been a director in the China Mutual Insurance Com- 
pany of Boston. In 1876, he was appointed representative 
of the " United States Lloyds," with John A. Conkey, under 
the firm name of Magoun & Conkey. The firm was dissolved 
by mutual consent, in 1877, and he continued the agency 
alone. He still continues in the insurance business in 
Boston. Address, 53 State Street, Boston. 

* EDWARD BROMFIELD MASON. — Born in Boston, 
July 2, 1837; son of William Powell and Hannah (Rogers) 
Mason. After graduation, he began the study of medicine 
• in Cambridge with Professor Wyman and Dr. Nichols; he 
also attended the lectures of the Harvard Medical School, 
from which he received the degree of M. D. in July, 1861. 
Naturally fond of an out-door life and adventure, he was 
anxious to join the cavalry service at the beginning of the 
war, but yielded to the wishes of his family, and applied for 
the position of surgeon. He was commissioned assistant 
surgeon in the Fourteenth Massachusetts, March i, 1862, 
and at once joined his regiment, then on the Potomac, He 
was taken prisoner in August, near Fairfax Court House, 
but soon released. The regiment (heavy artillery) was mainly 
employed in garrison duty, and Mason chafed much at the 
dull routine of his life. In December, however, he was 



52 

ordered to serve as medical director on the staff of Colonel 
Cogswell, acting brigadier-general ; but in January, 1863, he 
was forced to return to his inactive life in garrison. He 
applied for a transfer as assistant surgeon to some regiment 
in the field ; but this was found to be against the regulations, 
and he finally obtained a new commission as second lieutenant 
in the Second Massachusetts Cavalry, June 4, 1863. He 
returned home to join his new regiment, which was still in 
camp at Readville. Here, at parade one evening, his horse, 
an undisciplined one, reared and fell backwards upon him, 
inflicting a severe injury, which, after a fortnight of severe 
suffering, proved fatal. He died at the house of his sister, 
Mrs. Cabot, at Readville, Sept. 14, 1863. 

* JAMES MAY. —Born in Petersburg, Va., April 11, 
1837; son of David and Maria Ward (Pegram) May. After 
graduation, he studied law with his father in Petersburg, Va., 
and was living there at the commencement of the war, when 
he enlisted as a private in the Petersburg City Guards, which 
afterwards became a part of the Fourth Battalion of Virginia 
troops in the Confederate Army. He was made color-bearer 
and second lieutenant, afterwards first lieutenant, Company A, 
Twelfth Virginia Regiment, and was promoted to be captain. 
At the battle of Malvern Hill he was severely wounded by a 
sword-thrust in the arm, but remained with his company, and 
at the second battle of Manassas he was very badly wounded 
in the thigh, so that after the wound healed he was obliged to 
use crutches. He was then assigned to duty as an assistant 
to the provost marshal of Petersburg, and after the war was 
closed was assistant clerk of the court at Petersburg, and sub- 
sequently assistant freight agent of the Atlantic, Mississippi 
and Ohio Railroad Company. He lived with his sister and 
her family, and died in Petersburg, Va., in June, 1876. His 
brother, David Fitzhugh May, wrote to the Secretary that 
James was the last of four brothers who served in the Con- 



53 

federate Army. Three of them were killed in battle, and 
James was made a cripple for life. All the brothers served 
in Mahone's brigade, Longstreet's corps, and A. P. Hill's 
division. 

WILLIAM FREDERICK MILTON. — Born in Boston, 
Feb. i6, 1837 ; son of William Hamett and Amelia (Thibault) 
Milton. In November, 1858, he went to Manchester, England, 
and entered the counting-room of Messrs. Firth, Slingsby & 
Co. After spending a year there, he entered a branch firm 
at Huddersfield, in December, 1859. ^^ visited his home 
in the summer of i860. In September of that year he re- 
turned to England, and went into the firm of Messrs. Firth, 
Booth & Co., in Bradford. He returned to this country in 
May, 1 861, and, after spending a short time with his family, 
accepted a commission as second lieutenant in the Twentieth 
Massachusetts Regiment, July 10, 1861. He was promoted 
to first lieutenant, Oct. 12, 1861, and assigned to the staff of 
General Dana. He was commissioned captain, July 5, 1863. 
He served constantly upon the staff until, with his regiment, 
he was mustered out of service, July 26, 1864. He removed 
from Boston to New York, and became a partner in the new 
firm of Messrs. Wetmore, Cryder & Co., June 4, 1866. About 
a year afterwards, he sailed to China on business, where he 
remained until June, 1870, with the exception of a two-months' 
visit to America in the spring of 1869. He retired from the 
firm of Wetmore, Cryder & Co. in June, 1871, but continued 
in the same business under the firm name of W. F. Milton 
& Co. He was married, March 22, 1873, to Anna Ridgeway, 
daughter of the late Daniel L. Miller, Jr., of Philadelphia, and 
started at once for a trip round the world, which lasted a year. 
He visited China again in 1877. In 1880, he retired from 
active business, and purchased " Unkamet Farm," in Pitts- 
field, Mass., and has since devoted his attention to agricul- 
ture. Address, Coltsville, Berkshire County, Mass. 



54 

SETH MILLER MURDOCK. — Born in Boston, Aug. 6, 
1836; son of Warren and Abigail Thompson (Miller) Murdock. 
After graduation, he began the study of the law in the office of 
Messrs. Bonney, Titus & Roe, New York. He also attended 
the lectures of Columbia College, from which he received the 
degree of LL. B. in May, 1861. He took his degree of A. M. 
at the Commencement of that year, and was admitted to 
the New York bar in July. He practised his profession in the 
firm with which he had studied, the style of which was changed 
in 1863 to Bonney, Roe & Murdock. On Jan. i, 1867, he 
withdrew from the practice of the law, and became en- 
gaged in the iron business. He was agent for the Peekskill 
Iron Company. Address, 33 Garden Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

* JOHN DOLE MYRICK. — Born in Augusta, Me., Aug. 
2, 1835 ; son of Lot and Elizabeth C, (Dole) Myrick. A few 
months after graduation, he began the study of the law in the 
office of the Hon. R. H. Vose, in Augusta, Me. In September, 
i860, he entered the Harvard Law School He was on the 
point of admission to the Suffolk bar in September, 1861, 
when he was called home to take a commission as second lieu- 
tenant in the First Maine Cavalry. This commission is dated 
Nov. 2, 1861. With his regiment he had a share in the 
battles of 1862, Cedar Mountain, Bull Run, and Fredericks- 
burg. He was promoted to first lieutenant, Dec. 7, 1862 ; and 
to captain, Jan. 4, 1863. He led his company with credit on 
Stoneman's expedition, and shared all the dangers of the 
famous Dahlgren raid. He had a horse shot under him at 
Deep Bottom, Aug. 16, 1864. About this time he was stricken 
down by malarious fever, and forced to return home. But as 
soon as possible he rejoined his regiment, and after the battle 
at Dinwiddle Court House, he was brevetted major for meri- 
torious services. At the close of the war he was ordered to 
Augusta in command of three hundred and fifty men of his 
regiment, and upon his return to Virginia, was mustered out 



55 

of service, Aug. 14, 1S65. He resumed the study of the law, 
and was admitted to the Kennebec bar in October, 1865. He 
applied for and received a commission as first lieutenant, 
Tenth Cavalry (regulars), March 7, 1867. He was married, 
April 24, to Pauline Jones, daughter of Eben and Eliza (Wil- 
liams) Fuller, of Augusta, Me. He joined his regiment at 
Fort Leavenworth, in May, and served on the plains during the 
summer. The winter was passed at Fort Riley. The regi- 
ment took the field again in April, 1868. He was ordered in 
June to Bangor, Me., to give testimony in the case of the 
government against the postmaster at Houlton. He was 
brevetted captain, United States Army, for gallantry at Din- 
widdle Court House, March 21, 1865, to date from March 7, 
1867. After serving with his regiment in the Western Terri- 
tories five years, he resigned his commission. May 17, 1872, 
and returned to New England. He settled in Fitchburg, 
Mass., and commenced business as a druggist and apothecary, 
in March, 1873. He removed to Augusta, Me., Jan. i, 1876, 
and carried on the same business there, being the head of the 
" Fuller Drug Store," established in 18 19. He has contributed 
a number of articles on Rebellion matters to newspapers. 
He delivered the oration at the first annual reunion of the 
First Maine Cavalry Regiment, held at Augusta, in Septem- 
ber, 1872. He also made addresses at the reunions in Ban- 
gor, in 1873, Portland, in 1074, and read a poem at that held in 
Rockland, in 1875. He delivered the orations on Memorial 
Day, at Calais, in 1874, at Augusta, in 1875, at Bridgeton, in 
1876, at Gardiner, in 1877, and at West Waterville, in 1878. 
He also wrote a lecture, entitled " A Trooper's Ride with 
Sheridan in Lee's Last Campaign." He was the Department 
Commander of the Maine Grand Army of the Republic in 
1878. He had one child, a daughter, named Eliza Wil- 
liams, born Sept. 29, 1868. He was appointed State Librarian 
by Governor Connor, serving until the end of Governor Davis's 
administration. He continued in the drug business until a 



56 

short time before his death, and at the time of his death was 
chief clerk in the Pension Ofifice in Augusta, and Master of 
the Augusta Lodge of Masons. He died suddenly after only 
a week's illness, of erysipelas of the brain, at Augusta, Me., 
Dec. 27, 1882. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON COPP NOBLE. —Born in 
Somersworth, N. H., Nov. i, 1836; son of Mark and Mary 
C. (Copp) Noble. Immediately after graduation, he accepted 
an ushership in the Public Latin School, Boston, and retained 
it until September, i860, when he entered the Harvard Law 
School, accepting at the same time a proctorship in the col- 
lege. In March, 1861, he was appointed tutor of Latin in 
Harvard College. He was married in New York, May 28, 
1861, to Laura, daughter of the Rev. Dr. Francis L. Hawks. 
He took his degree of A. M. in 1863. In January, 1864, he 
was offered the position of Latin professor in Washington 
University, St. Louis, and removed thither in July. He re- 
signed his professorship in June, 1866, and in October, of the 
same year, opened a school for boys at No. 2j Pemberton 
Square, Boston. He removed his school to No. 40 Winter 
Street in May, 1867, and to 174 Tremont Street in September, 
1884. In 1868, he was elected a member of the Board of Over- 
seers of Harvard College, and was re-elected for a term of six 
years, in 1872. He resides in Cambridge, and has children: 
Katherine Nash, born Nov. 6, 1862 ; John, born May 5, 1864 ; 
Francis Lister Hawks, born Dec. 22, 1866. His daughter, 
Josephine Hawks, born Jan. 8, 1869, died Jan. 13, 1874. 
Another daughter, Laura Hawks, born Oct. 9, 1872, died Jan. 
15, 1874. A third son, George Washington Copp, was born 
Dec. 26, 1874. His eldest son graduated at Harvard in 1885, 
and his second son is in the class of 1888. His daughter, 
Katherine, was married in June, 1887, to James J. Green- 
ough, of Cambridge. His address is No. 21 Concord Avenue, 
Cambridge, Mass. 



57 

* FREDERICK MALCOLM NORCROSS. — Born in 
Bangor, Me., Sept, i8, 1836. After graduation, he spent 
three years in the study of the law in the office of Messrs. 
Morse & Marshall, Lowell. He did not practise his profes- 
sion, having become interested in mechanical inventions. He 
was commissioned second lieutenant in the Thirtieth Massa- 
chusetts Regiment, Feb. 20, 1862. The regiment served in 
Louisiana, and in General Butler's official report of the battle of 
Baton Rouge, Norcross is twice mentioned : " specially com- 
mended for leaving the hospital to fight"; and for "daring 
courage in the field as acting aid to Colonel Dudley." He was 
promoted to first lieutenant, Aug. 19, 1862. Hewas wounded 
at Port Hudson, May 21, 1863, and came home to recover 
from his injuries. He was promoted to captain, and assistant 
quartermaster United States Volunteers, Feb. 29, 1864, and was 
ordered to report to General Canby at Vicksburg. He was 
mustered out March 13, 1866. After the close of the war, he 
lived in New York, engaged in various business enterprises, 
and was married. He died in New York, Dec. 24, 1587. 

JOHN BUTTRICK NOYES.— Born in Petersham, March 
2, 1838; son of George R. and Eliza W. (Buttrick) Noyes. 
After several futile attempts to secure some business occupa- 
tion, he entered the law office of Messrs. C. T. & T. H. Rus- 
sell, Boston, Dec. 20, 1858. He entered the Harvard Law 
School in September, 1859. In May, i860, he entered the 
office of Judge Richardson, Boston. Not very long after- 
wards, he decided to abandon the idea of practising law, and 
in October, i860, he entered the bookstore of A. K. Loring, 
as clerk. He enlisted as private in the Fourth Battalion of 
Rifles, May 13, 1861, and did garrison duty at Fort Inde- 
pendence till the middle of July. After an ineffectual at- 
tempt to recruit a company, he rejoined the Rifles, now a 
part of the Thirteenth Massachusetts, July 28, 1861, and 
went into active service immediately. The regiment was at 



58 

Winchester, Cedar Mountain, Thoroughfare Gap, and Bull 
Run. At this last battle, Aug. 30, 1862, he was slightly- 
wounded. The regiment was engaged at Chantilly, South 
Mountain, and Antietam. Here Noyes was again wounded, 
and was not able to rejoin his regiment until February, 

1863. He was detailed as clerk at the provost marshal gen- 
eral's office, March 14, and remained on duty there until 
towards the last of April. He was commissioned second 
lieutenant in the Twenty-eighth Massachusetts, April 6, 1863, 
and joined his regiment on the battle-field of Chancellors- 
ville, May 4. He was actively engaged while in command of 
his company on the second and third days at the battle of 
Gettysburg, also at Auburn and Bristow Station, Oct. 14, 
1863; and at Mine Run, Nov. 29, 1863. Together with his 
regiment, attached to the Second Brigade, First Division, 
Second Corps, he crossed the Rapidan, May 4, 1864, and was 
engaged in the fierce contest in the Wilderness, May 5, 6, 
and 7 ; at Todd's Tavern, May 8, and the Po River, May 10. 
At daylight. May 12, was in the memorable charge of Han- 
cock at Spottsylvania, and assisted in heaving the captured 
cannon over the salient. Was also in the sanguinary charge 
at Spottsylvania (second), May 18. He commanded his regi- 
ment at Cold Harbor, June 3, and in the gallant charges at 
Petersburg, June 16 and 18; was also in the disastrous fight 
at Petersburg, June 22, when his conduct was commended 
on the field by Generals Miles and Barlow, Shortly after the 
battle, he was assigned, by order of General Barlow, as assistant 
inspector-general, Third Brigade, and in that capacity was 
engaged at Deep Bottom and at Reams' Station, Sept. 25, 

1864. Shortly after, he was appointed aid to General Macy, 
commanding a brigade in the Second Division, Second Corps, 
with whom he served until Dec. 13, when he returned to 
Massachusetts to be mustered out, Dec. 19, [864. He was 
commissioned first lieutenant, May 12, 1863, and captain, 
May 6, 1864. Brevetted major United States Volunteers, 



59 

March 13, 1865, and lieutenant-colonel and colonel United 
States Volunteers, " for meritorious conduct while in com- 
mand of regiment before Petersburg, Va., in the engage- 
ments of June 16 and 20, 1864." After leaving the army, he 
remained at home until May 24, 1865, when he became 
assistant librarian of the Mercantile Library at Brooklyn, 
N. Y. On July 5, 1865, he entered the employ of Messrs. 
Woodruff & Robinson, dealers in fish and salt, in New 
York City, and continued with their successors, J. P. & G. C. 
Robinson, in the storage department of the business, until 
April 15, 1885, when he entered the employ of William 
Beard & Co., proprietors of the Erie Basin Warehouses. 
These warehouses having been leased to the Empire Ware- 
house Company, he entered the service of that corpora- 
tion, March 12, 1888. He resides at 223 DeGraw Street, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. Has resided since 1865 in Brooklyn, and has 
never married. Member of " Military Order of the Loyal 
Legion of the United States." Joint author, with Mr. C. 
S. Peirce, of article on " Shakespearian Pronunciation " in 
"North American Review" for April, 1864, acknowledged 
by A. J. Ellis to be the first and only serious treatment of 
the subject up to the time of the publication of his great 
work. Address, No. 5 Hanover Street, New York City. 

JOHN GRAY PARK. — Born in Groton, Jan. 3, 1838; 
son of John G. and Maria (Thayer) Park. From graduation 
until February, 1862, he lived in Boston, and attended the 
lectures of the Harvard Medical School. In May, 1861, he 
was appointed one of the house physicians at the Massachu- 
setts General Hospital. He was appointed acting assistant 
surgeon in the navy, Feb. 19, 1862, and ordered to the Vic- 
toria, on the coast of North Carolina. In April, 1864, he 
was ordered to the Mendota, a new steamer fitting out in 
New York. In the summer of this year, an attack of illness 
forced him to obtain leave of absence, which he spent at his 



6o 

home in Groton. In December, he was ordered to the West 
Gulf squadron. He was honorably discharged from the 
service, Nov. 6, 1865. He spent the next winter in study in 
Boston, and in March, 1866, received the degree of M. D. 
He began the practice of his profession in Worcester, June 
19, 1866, and still continues to reside there, where he has 
been in charge of the Lunatic Hospital since 1872. He 
married, Oct. 22, 1872, Elizabeth B., daughter of the Hon. A. 
F. Lawrence, of Groton, Mass. He has one son, born Dec. 
16, 1873. Spent the summer of 1881 in Europe. During 
this trip, he gave special attention to study of the methods 
used for the care and management of the insane in Great 
Britain. Address, Worcester, Mass. 

SAMUEL PASCO. — Born in London, England, June 28, 
1834; son of John and Amelia (Nash) Pasco. In January, 
1859, he took charge of the Waukeenah Academy, Jefferson 
County, Fla., where the commencement of the war found 
him. He enlisted in the Third Florida Volunteers, Aug. 10, 
1 86 1. The regiment, after some little time, was ordered to 
join General Beauregard's army at Corinth, and was attached 
to General Bragg's arm}^ during his Kentucky campaign. 
He was frequently detailed as clerk at regimental and brigade 
headquarters, and at the adjutant-general's office. He was 
in the battle of Chickamauga, and at Mission Ridge, in 
November, 1863, was left on the field with his leg shattered 
by a minie-ball. He was a prisoner in different hospitals for 
nearly six months, and then sent to Camp Morton, Indiana. 
Here he remained until paroled in March, 1865, when he 
returned to Florida. He resumed his place in the academy, 
but having been elected clerk of the Circuit Court, he re- 
moved to Monticello, the county town, in January, 1866. 
He was then appointed clerk of the Criminal Court, and of 
the town council. He performed much of the office work 
by deputy, and gave his own time to the study of the law. 



6i 

He was admitted to the bar, Oct. 5, 1868, and went inta 
partnership with his instructor, Mr. Dilworth, who died in 
September, 1869, ^^^I left Pasco a large practice, almost all 
of which he was able tp retain. He formed a new partner- 
ship in the spring of 1877, ^^'^ the firm name was Pasco & 
Palmer. He was a member of the town council for nine 
years, declining a re-election in 1878. For some years he 
has been a trustee of Jefferson Academy. He is a prominent 
Mason, and was for three years Grand Master of the Florida 
Grand Lodge. In the political campaign of 1876, he was 
chairman of the State Executive Committee of the Demo- 
cratic party. He has made many Masonic and political 
addresses, but published nothing of permanent value. He 
received the degree of A. M. in 1872. He married, Oct. 28, 
1869, Jessie Denham, daughter of William Denham, Esq.,^ of 
Monticello. Their children are : Elizabeth, born Aug. 19, 
1870; Emily, born June 18, 1873; William Denham, born 
Dec. 14, 1875 ; Samuel, born March 21, 1878 ; John, born Sept. 
20, 1880 ; and James Denham, born Feb. 25, 1883. He has 
practised law in Monticello without a partner since 1881, 
Has been chairman of the Democratic State Executive Com- 
mittee since 1876, and since 1880 a member of Democratic 
National Committee. Was Presidential elector at large in 
1880, and led the ticket. At the State Convention, in June, 
1884, was a candidate for the gubernatorial nomination, and 
at first received a plurality of votes, but, to prevent a dead- 
lock, withdrew his name, and on his motion General Perry 
was nominated unanimously. Served as a member of a 
State Board of Education, 1 879-1 880. W^as nominated by 
both Democrats and Republicans a member of the Constitu- 
tional Convention, held in June, 1885, and was elected with- 
out an opponent, and on its organization was elected its 
president by a unanimous vote. In December, 1886, elected 
representative from Jefferson County to the House of Rep- 
resentatives of Florida, first held under the new constitution, 



62 

and on its organization, April 5, 1887, was elected its Speaker. 
He was nominated for United States senator by the Demo- 
crats by acclamation for the term which began in 1887, and 
May 19 was elected by a vote of eighty-four to seventeen, 
and took his seat as a senator from Florida at the opening of 
the Fiftieth Congress. His home and family are still in 
Monticello. Address, Monticello, Jefferson County, Fla. 

* HENRY LYMAN PATTEN. — Born in Kingston, 
N. H., April 4, 1836; son of Colcord and Maria (Fletcher) 
Patten. After graduating with high honors, Patten spent a 
year as tutor in the Free Academy at Utica, N. Y., and in 
November, 1859, went to Montgomery, near Savannah, Ga., 
as private tutor. In September, i860, he accepted an 
assistant professorship in the academical department of Wash- 
ington University, St. Louis. He resigned this position, 
after holding it for a year, and entered the Law School at 
Cambridge in September, 1861, and was appointed at the 
same time a proctor in the college. Immediately after the 
battle of Ball's Bluff, in October, 1861, he applied for a 
commission, arid on Nov. 25 was commissioned second lieu- 
tenant in the Twentieth Massachusetts Regiment, in place of 
William L. Putnam, and in the same company with Lowell. 
He continued to serve in this regiment, and took part in all 
its battles, long marches, and severe duties, until his death. 
In the summer of 1862, his regiment was actively engaged 
in the Peninsular campaign, and in the battle of Glendale 
both Lowell and Patten were wounded — Lowell mortally, and 
Patten with a deep flesh wound in the leg. He rejoined his 
regiment, after a brief furlough, in season to take part in its 
next battle, at Chantilly, and he was in the thickest of the 
fight in the battles of South Mountain and Antietam. He 
was commissioned first lieutenant, Oct. i, 1862. He was en- 
gaged in the assaults upon the heights of Fredericksburg, 
under Burnside and under Hooker, and at the battle of Gettys- 



^^3 

burg behaved with distinguished gallantry, and was wounded 
in the leg and in the hand. The middle finger of his right 
hand was amputated, and he was furloughed for a short time. 
He now received a commission as captain, dated May i, 1863. 
Returning to duty, he went through the fatiguing campaign 
of Mine Run. He was shot through the hand in the battle 
of the Wilderness, May 6, 1864, and, Colonel Macy having 
been disabled, and Major Abbott killed, the command of the 
regiment devolved upon him. He was in command of the 
Twentieth at Spottsylvania, at North Anna, at Cold Harbor, 
and before Petersburg. In the attack upon the Weldon Rail- 
road, June 22, by his coolness and strategical skill, and the 
courage and discipline of his men, an advancing rebel column, 
which had broken two divisions into confusion before it, was 
checked and stayed. His commission as major, which he re- 
ceived shortly before his death, was dated June 20, 1864. On 
Aug. 14, Colonel Macy resumed the command of the regi- 
ment. On Aug. 16, in the fight at Deep Bottom, Patten 
was wounded by a rifle-ball in the left knee. Amputation 
was performed, and he was removed to Turner's Lane Hos- 
pital in Philadelphia. He was tenderly cared for here, and 
endured his great sufferings with heroic fortitude, writing 
cheerfully and hopefully of his condition to his friends ; but 
he had been so much weakened by fatigue, anxiety, and dis- 
ease, that he could not recover. He died Sept, 10, 1864. 
His body was brought to Cambridge, where funeral services 
were performed in the college chapel, conducted by Presi- 
dents Walker and Hill, and Dr. Peabody, and a long proces- 
sion of officers and students of the college, officers of his 
regiment and of other regiments, classmates and friends, fol- 
lowed it to Mount Auburn. The stone which marks his grave 
there was erected by his classmates. A commission as briga- 
dier-general by brevet has been conferred upon Patten since 
his death, upon the recommendation of General Meade, for 
gallantry and good conduct at the battle of Deep Bottom. 



64 

* DANIEL CHAMBERLAIN PAYNE. — Born in Ban- 
gor, Me., Feb. ii, 1837; son of William and Martha L. 
(Chamberlain) Payne. In September, 1858, he went to Eu- 
rope, intending to study architecture in Paris, but was taken 
sick with fever, and soon returned. In October, i860, he 
started in a sailing vessel for Malta, and finally settled to 
study in Paris. In 1862, he became attached to the U. S. 
Leo-ation at Madrid as assistant secretary. He retained this 
position till the summer of 1863, and for a time, in the ab- 
sence of the Secretary of Legation, had charge of the office 
and current business of the Legation. He returned to Boston 
in August, 1863, and, in November, accepted a position on the 
staff of General William Dwight, then in New Orleans. In 
December, he was appointed first lieutenant in the United 
States colored troops. He was in the battle of Pleasant 
Hill, La., in April, 1864, and in Sheridan's army, in the Shen- 
andoah Valley, in August. On June 15, 1865, he was brevet- 
ted a captain of volunteers " for gallantry and meritorious 
services at the battles of Sabine Cross Roads and Pleasant 
Hill," and on the same day he was further brevetted a major 
of volunteers "for gallantry and meritorious services at the 
battles of Opequad, Fisher's Hill, and Cedar Creek, Va." He 
was at home on a short furlough, in January, 1865. After 
leaving the army, he lived in Boston until April 11, 1866, 
when he sailed for Europe, He spent the winter of 1867-68 
in Pau and Algiers, in ill health, and was in Florence in the 
spring. He died at Montreux, Switzerland, Sept. 28, 1868, 
of consumption. 

*JOHN CHARLES PHILLIPS.— Born in Boston, Oct. 21, 
1838 ; son of JohnC. and Harriet (Welch) Phillips. After grad- 
uation, he entered the counting-room of Messrs. R. C. Mackay 
& Son, Boston, where he remained until July 28, i860, when he 
sailed for Calcutta, to take charge of a branch house there. 
He returned to Boston in July, 1862. In 1864, he made, a 



65 

short visit to England and France. On July i, 1865, he 
formed a copartnership with Mr. William Mackay, in New 
York, for the purpose of transacting a general commission 
business. The style of the firm was William .Mackay & Co. 
Retired from business in 1873, having received a large prop- 
erty under the will of a cousin, William Phillips. He spent 
some time in Europe ; and tlien resided in Boston, in winter, 
and in North Beverly, near Wenham Lake, in summer. He 
was married in London, Oct. 23, 1875, to Anna, daughter of 
Alanson Tucker, Esq., of Boston. His children are : John 
Charles, born Nov. 5, 1876; William, born May 30, 1878; 
Anna Tucker, born April 25, 1880; Martha Robeson, born 
Feb. I, 1882 ; and George Wendell, born Nov. 22, 1883. He 
died of heart disease in Boston, March i, 1885. He was a 
member of the Massachusetts Historical Society, a director of 
the Boston and Albany Railroad, and of the National Union 
Bank, and one of the trustees, as well as a liberal benefactor 
of Phillips Exeter Academy. He made large gifts also to the 
Phillips Andover Academy, and to the Children's Hospital, 
in Boston, and was one of the managers of the Children's 
Hospital, the School for the Blind, and the Peabody Museum. 

GEORGE EDWARD POND.— Born in Boston, March 
II, 1837; son of Moses and Nancy (Adams) Pond. Imme- 
diately after graduation, he entered the Harvard Law School, 
from which he received the degree of LL. B. in July, i860. 
For the next six months he was engaged in assisting Profes- 
sor Parsons in preparing his Notes and Bills ; and also wrote 
several articles for " Bouvier's Law Dictionary," and " Apple- 
ton's Cyclopaedia." He entered the office of Messrs. Sohier & 
Dexter, Boston, March i, 1861. He was admitted to the Suf- 
folk bar, Jan. 7, 1862, and opened an office at No. 23, Niles's 
Block. In June and July, he perfor ned guard duty at Fort 
Warren with the Cadets. In August, he recruited a com- 
pany for the Forty-fifth Massachusetts, and was commissioned 



66 

Its second lieutenant, Aug. 27, and first lieutenant, Oct. 14, 
1862. The regiment (nine-months men) served in North 
Carolina, and was in the battles of Kingston, Whitehall, and 
Goldsboro'. He was mustered out of service, July 21, 1863, 
and resumed the practice of his profession at No. 12 Niles's 
Block. In the spring of 1864, he removed to New York, and 
became one of the editors of the " Army and Navy Journal." 
Soon afterwards, he became a regular editorial contributor to 
the New York Times. In May, 1866, he resigned the editor- 
ship of the Journal, in order to write, jointly with Mr. Swin- 
ton, the "Decisive Battles of the War." In the autumn of 
1866, he resumed the position of chief editorial writer in the 
Journal, which he still continues to hold, and also resumed 
his contributions to the New York Times. He married, in 
Brooklyn, May 29, 1866, Emily, daughter of Auguste and 
Louise Guerber, of Brooklyn, and has four children : Alice, 
Nelly, Isabel, and Ethel. From May, 1864, to 1866, he wrote 
nearly the whole of the editorial articles in the Journal, in- 
cluding the " Situation," and the criticism of the military 
operations. From November, 1866, to 1870, he wrote most 
of the leading articles. ' He has also written a great deal for 
the New York Times, in the " Minor Topics." He continued 
on the staff of the New York Times until the death of Mr. 
Raymond. In 1870, he was engaged by Mr. W. J. Swain, of 
Philadelphia, to take the editorship of the Public Record, a 
paper about to be established in that city. He remained 
editor of the Record until its owner sold it in 1877, when he 
returned to New York, and resumed his connection with the 
" Army and Navy Journal," and his editorial contributions to 
daily newspapers. In 1866, he wrote six of the twelve essays 
in William Swinton's " Decisive Battles of the War," and 
afterwards, jointly with Mr. Swinton, "The History of the 
Seventh Regiment, National Guard of New York." He has 
written much in the "Galaxy," "United States Service 
Magazine," "North American Review," '• Nation," " Round 



Table," etc. In 1882, he wrote " The Shenandoah Valley in 
1864," published by Charles Scribner's Sons as a volume of 
their " Campaigns of the Civil War." He lived in Brooklyn 
till the death of his wife, Jan. 14, 1880, and soon after re- 
moved to 345 West Twentieth Street, New York City, where 
he still resides. He is a member of the Authors' Club and 
of the Fellowcraft Club of that city. He writes, June 7, that 
his daughter, Alice, has just passed her last examination in 
her fourth year at Columbia College, and will graduate June 
13, " the first of her sex to complete the regular A. B. course 
at that college." Address, "Army and Navy Journal " office, 
New York. 

EDWARD GRIFFIN PORTER.— Born in Boston, Jan. 
24, 1837; son of Royal L. and Sarah A. (Pratt) Porter. He 
sailed for Europe a few weeks before our Class Day, and spent 
much time in travelling in Egypt and Syria. He studied in 
Berlin and Heidelberg, and, returning home in July, 1861, en- 
tered the Andover Theological Seminary in September. He 
was licensed to preach by the Norfolk Association, at Brain- 
tree, Jan. 26, 1864. In the spring of the same year, while on 
a visit to the West, he was attacked by fever, and so reduced 
in strength as to prevent much labor for many months. After 
graduating from Andover in August, he remaii ed at home in 
Dorchester, taking charge of the church there during the ab- 
sence of its pastor. During the next year, he preached occa- 
sionally in various places ; but did not feel able to accept 
any proposals for settlement. By the advice of his physician 
and friends, he sailed again for Europe, May 31, 1866. After 
some time spent in England, he went to Switzerland and 
Italy. Here he studied with great interest the Waldensian 
movement to give Protestant churches and schools to all the 
principal towns, and was almost persuaded to accept the 
charge of the new Italian church at Venice. He went next 
to Malta, and thence to the East, where he spent the spring 



68 

of 1867. The work of the American Mission at Beirut, and 
on the slopes of Mount Lebanon, engaged much of his atten- 
tion. Afterwards, in Greece, he aided in the distribution of 
some of the American supplies among the Cretan refugees. 
Returning through Austria and Germany, he reached Paris in 
time to see the close of the great exhibition. He arrived at 
home in January, 1868, and after his return, was occupied in 
arranging the materials collected in his journey. He took his 
degree of A. M. in July, 1861. He was ordained over the 
Hancock Congregational Church, in Lexington, Mass., Oct. 
I, 1868, and still continues to be their pastor. He has been 
called to serve the town in various capacities : as chairman of 
the School Committee, Trustee of the Public Library, etc. He 
has occasionally accepted invitations to lecture in Boston and 
other places. He is a member of the Board of Visitors of 
Bradford Academy, and of the Overseers' Committee to visit 
Harvard College, and is acting with the trustees of the new 
American college, at Aintab, in Asiatic Turkey. He repre- 
sented Massachusetts in the collection of the Historical 
Department, at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition, in 
1876. He has written for various papers and magazines, and 
is the author of an historical sketch of Lexington, published 
in 1875. He is a member of the Massachusetts Historical 
Society, of the American Antiquarian Society, and of the 
New England Historic Genealogical Society. In 1887, he pub- 
lished " Rambles in Old Boston, New England." He is now 
on a tour round the world, visiting missionary stations of the 
American Board in India, China, and Japan. 

* HENRY AUGUSTUS RICHARDSON. — Born in Bos- 
ton, Nov. 25, 1836; son of George C. and Susan G. (Moore) 
Richardson. In October, 1858, he commenced the study of 
medicine at the United States Marine Hospital in Chelsea, 
then under the charge of Dr. Charles A. Davis. He came 
regularly to Boston to attend the lectures of the Harvard 



69 

Medical School, and there received the degree of M. D., in 
July, 1861. He had previously been appointed assistant 
physician of the hospital. He decided at once to enter the 
service of his country, and, after passing the usual examina- 
tion, was commissioned acting assistant surgeon in the navy, 
Aug. 12, 1861. This was the first appointment from New 
England after the breaking out of the Rebellion, and his ves- 
sel, the Cambridge, was the first merchant steamer that left 
the Charlestown Navy Yard, refitted as a gunboat. Somewhat 
to his disappointment, his vessel was assigned to the monoto- 
nous blockade off Wilmington and Beaufort. However, as 
always, he faithfully performed his duties, and from the con- 
stant exposure incident to them was developed a disease 
which had already proved fatal to other members of his fam- 
ily. He was forced to resign his commission, June 5, 1862. 
He gained some strength in the comfort of home, and spent 
the summer months in Southern New Hampshire. At the ap- 
proach of winter, desiring a drier climate than that of New 
England, he went to Minnesota. But the disease had made 
too deep an inroad, and he returned home in May, fully im- 
pressed with the certainty of impending death. He lingered, 
without much pain, until July i, 1863, when he died at his 
father's house in Cambridge. 

* NATHANIEL RUSSELL, Jr. — Born in Plymouth, 
June 13, 1837 ; son of Nathaniel and Catherine E. (Elliott) 
Russell. Immediately after graduation, he returned to Plym- 
outh, and entered his father's counting-room. He was nat- 
urally very fond of navigation, and embraced an early oppor- 
tunity to enter the service of the United States Coast Survey. 
He went, with Captain Harrison, to Eastern Virginia, and, 
while in discharge of his duties there, was attacked by lung 
fever. He died, after only one week's illness, in Drummond- 
town, Accomack County, Va., March 25, 1862. 



70 

*AMORY POLLARD SAWYER. — Born in Bolton, 
Oct. 30, 1833 ; son of Nathan and Lucinda (Pollard) Sawyer. 
He was absent from college during almost all the Senior year, 
from ill health. A fishing voyage on which he went was of 
no benefit ; nor a long horseback ride through the mountain 
region of New Hampshire, undertaken after graduation. He 
returned to his home, and lived quietly, waiting for the inevi- 
table end. He was twice chosen by his fellow townsmen a 
member of their School Committee, and performed such duties 
as his health would permit. He died at his father's house in 
Bolton, Mass., May 20, i860. 

JOSEPH ALDEN SHAW. — Born in Athol, Jan. 4, 
1836 ; son of Linus H. and Louisa (Alden) Shaw. After 
graduation, he was appointed principal of the Academy at 
Nevi Salem, Mass. Here he remained a year, and then came 
to Boston, and commenced the study of the law in the office of 
John Wilder, Esq. In January, i860, he accepted the posi- 
tion of first assistant master in the Elm Park Collegiate In- 
stitute, Litchfield, Conn. He resigned this in April, 1861, 
to take charge of the grammar school in West Yarmouth, 
Mass. He removed again to Connecticut in the autumn, 
and took charge of a select school in Woodbury. The next 
summer he was invited to return to New Salem, his first field, 
and he became preceptor of the Academy there in September, 
1862. Here he remained five years. In April, 1863, he was 
chosen one of the School Committee of the town, and retained 
the office as long as he resided there. He was married, Nov. 
18, 1863, to Eliza Antoinette, daughter of Clark and Nancy 
(Kendall) Thompson, of New Salem. A son, who lived but 
a few hours, was born, April 16, 1865 ; a second son, named 
Henry Alden, was born June 3, 1867. During his residence 
in New Salem he wrote two lectures : one, on the " White 
Hills and their Scenery " ; the other, on " Chemistry." These 
have been delivered in various places. He took his degree 



71 

of A. M. in July, i865. He removed to Worcester in August, 
1867, having accepted the position of teacher of ancient 
languages and rhetoric in the Highland Military Academy 
there, and in 1871 he was made principal. He has published, 
in the Proceedings of the American Institute of Instruction, 
a lecture on " English Pronunciation : What have Teachers 
to do about it?" He has contributed various articles on 
philological and educational subjects to the "Journal of Educa- 
tion " and to the daily journals. He is a member of the Amer- 
ican Philological Association. His third son, Robert Kendall, 
was born July 18, 1871. His son Henry is in the second 
year at the Harvard Medical School. In 1881, having been 
invited by J. B. Chickering, of Cincinnati, to be instructor of 
Latin and Greek in the Chickering Institute in Cincinnati, 
he went there in September of that year, and held the posi- 
tion till the year following Mr. Chickering's death. He then 
returned East, and in 1883, was called to the care of the 
Classical Department of Trinity School, Tivoli-on-Hudson, 
N. Y. In the summer of 1887, he returned to Worcester, 
and is again head master of the Highland Military Academy, 
in that city. Address, Highland Military Academy, Worces- 
ter, Mass. 

* FRANK HOWARD SHOREY. — Born in Boston, 
Nov. 2, 1837; son of John and Cornelia (Guild) Shorey. 
He commenced his legal studies immediately after gradu- 
ation, in the office of J. H. Wakefield, Esq., No. 10 Court 
Street, Boston. He was admitted to the Suffolk bar in 
December, 1859, and be2:an the practice of his profession 
in the office where he had studied. He had every prospect 
of success, but symptoms of consumption soon appeared, 
and he was forced to give up work. He sank slowly under 
the disease, and died at his home in Dedham, Jan. 24, 
1862. 



72 

* THOMAS JEFFERSON SPURR. — Born in Worces- 
ter, Feb. 2, 1838; son of Samuel D. and Marv A. (Lamb) 
Spurr. After graduation, he remained at home for a time in 
ill health ; then commenced the study of the law, at first with 
the help of a reader, and afterwards unaided, as his eyes, 
which had troubled him much in college, grew better. He 
was in the office of Messrs. Devens & Hoar in Worcester, 
until September, i860, when he entered the Harvard Law 
School. His eyes soon began again to trouble him ; and in 
April, i86r, he sailed for Russia with the hope of improving 
his health. He was there when the war broke out, and hast- 
ened home, arriving in September. After the battle of Ball's 
Bluff, he was offered and accepted a commission as first lieu- 
tenant in the Fifteenth Massachusetts, commanded by his 
friend, Colonel Devens. His commission is dated Nov. 17, 
1 86 1. He at once joined his regiment, and with it shared 
all the battles of the Peninsular campaign. At the battle of 
Antietam, Sept. 17, 1862, while dressing the line of his com- 
pany, he received a mortal wound. His thigh was shattered 
by a minie-ball. Two of his men came where he lay, and 
offered to carry him to the rear, but he ordered them back to 
the ranks. The regiment was almost instantly forced to re- 
treat to the shelter of a wood, and the ground where he fell 
was not again occupied by our troops until after the battle. 
He lay on the ground all day and all night. The next day 
the enemy occupied the ground, and a South Carolina officer, 
a college acquaintance, caused him to be removed to a 
farm-yard near by, and gave him a blanket. Here our forces 
found him when they reoccupied the ground, three days 
afterwards. He was taken to the nearest hospital, and 
then to Hagerstown, where his mother and brother-in-law 
joined him. He suffered terrible agony until an operation 
was performed ; but even then there was no hope of saving 
his life. He was conscious to the last, met death bravely, 
and throughout all his suffering, thought only of others. 



73 

He died in Hagerstown, Md., ten days after the battle, 
Sept. 27, 1862. 

JOHN THOMAS STODDARD. — Born in Plymouth, 
Jan. 24, 1838 ; son of Isaac H, and Martha Le Baron (Thomas) 
Stoddard. After a short trip to the West, in the fall of 1858, 
he settled in Plymouth, and began farming. He was also 
interested in the ice business, and employed as clerk in the 
Plymonth Bank until 1863. At that time he became engaged 
in a rivet company, and took charge of a mill for making 
cotton bagging by a new process, for which he had taken out 
a patent. He was married, Oct. 19, 1864, to Elizabeth, daugh- 
ter of Jeremiah and Mary C. Farris, of Plymouth. A son, 
named Henry Farris, was born Feb. 5, 1866; a daughter, 
named Mary Le Baron, was born May 11, 1S67. He still 
resides in Plymouth, Mass. 

JOHN PUTNAM SWINERTON. — Born in Taunton, 
Dec. 29, 1838; son of John P. and Rebecca B. (Spalding) 
Swinerton. From graduation until 1862, he was engaged in 
teaching a school in Norton, Mass. He was next appointed 
principal of the academy in Dighton. He resigned this to 
accept the place of sub-master in the Taunton High School, 
in September, 1863. He took his degree of A. M. in 1866. 
In February, 1867, he was promoted to the office of prin- 
cipal in the High School. He continued principal of the 
Taunton High School until September, 1877, when he re- 
signed to accept the corresponding position in Lynn, Mass. 
He was appointed principal of the Framingham High School 
and Academy in September, 1881 ; and March i, 1886, went 
back to Taunton to take charge of the High School there. 
Address, Taunton, Mass. 

JAMES DANFORTH THURBER. — Born in Plymouth, 
Feb. 21, 1839; son of James and Elizabeth (Danforth) Thur- 



74 

ber. During the first winter after graduation, he was a 
teacher in a boarding school in Pottstown, Penn. He re- 
turned to his home in Plymouth in February, 1859. ^^ the 
autumn of that year he took charge of a school in Norton, 
Mass., but resigned it in the spring to accept the charge of 
one in Plymouth. He gave this up in December, i860, and 
resumed the one in Norton. In April, 1861, he went to 
Washington, and in July of the same year was appointed a 
clerk in the Treasury. Here he remained until Aug. 12, 
1862, when he enlisted as a private in the Thirteenth Massa- 
chusetts. After serving ten months in the ranks, and shar- 
ing the dangers of four battles, in one of which (Antietam) 
he was wounded, he received a commission as second lieu- 
tenant in the Fifty-fifth Massachusetts, June 15, 1863, He 
was promoted to first lieutenant, June 29, 1863 ; captain, 
Nov. 3, 1863 ; and was brevetted major United States Volun- 
teers, March 13, 1865. With his regiment, he served in 
North and South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. He was 
in the battle of Honey Hill, and in both attacks on Jjimes 
Island. He was among the first to enter Charleston after 
the evacuation. He was officially reported for gallantry after 
Honey Hill, and was a second time wounded at James Island. 
His term of service expired Aug. 29, 1865. He returned to 
the South as a civilian, and resided in Charleston and Savan- 
nah. He returned to Plymouth in December, 1866, and was 
appointed to a situation in the Boston Custom House, March 
20, 1867. He was married, Aug. 12, 1862, to Mary A., daugh- 
ter of Amasa and Esther S. Bartlett, of Plymouth. A daugh- 
ter, named Elizabeth, was born Sept. 5, 1866; a son, named 
William, was born March 27, 1868; and a daughter, named 
Mary Tyler, born July 11, 1874. He resigned his place in 
the Boston Custom House in November, 1874, to accept 
a situation in the Plymouth Savings Bank. This he con- 
tinues to hold. He has been a member of the School Com- 
mittee for the past eight years, and for many years one of 



75 

the Trustees of the Pilgrim Society. Address, Plymouth, 
Mass. 

GERARD CURTIS TOBEY. — Born in Wareham, Oct. 
16, 1836; son of Joshua B. and Susannah K. (Pratt) Tobey. 
After graduation, he was for a short time clerk in the Ware- 
ham Bank, but, having decided to study law, he entered the 
Harvard Law School in November, 1858. He received the 
degree of LL. B. in i860, and entered the ofifice of Messrs. 
Brooks & Ball, Boston. In September, 1862, he enlisted as 
a private in the Massachusetts Light Battery, nine-months 
men. He was admitted to the Suffolk bar in May, 1863. In 
June, he was offered a commission as first lieutenant in the 
Second Massachusetts Cavalry, but declined it. He con- 
tinued in the law ofifice of Messrs. Brooks & Ball, in Boston, 
becoming a member of the firm in January, 1869. In 1872, 
the increasing demands of his private interests, and the per- 
sonal attention due to business trusts with which he continues 
to be associated, compelled his withdrawal from the copart- 
nership. He was in Europe in 1877; since his return has 
been actively employed in law, banking, shipping, and manu- 
facturing, and the management of trust estates. He resides 
in Wareham. Address, 160 High Street, Boston. 

HORACE PRATT TOBEY. — Born in Wareham, Jan. 
4, 1838; son of Joshua B. and Susannah K. (Pratt) Tobey. 
After spending a year at home, in October, 1859, he formed 
a partnership with Mr. Henry Leeds, Jr.. under the style of 
Leeds & Tobey, in the iron and commission business, No. 23 
Broad Street, Boston. In October, 1862, the partnership was 
dissolved, and he continued the business alone. In 1863, he 
built a spike manufactory in Cambridgeport. In January, 
1871, he was appointed acting treasurer of the Tremont Nail 
Company, a corporation located in West Wareham, Mass. ; 
and, in July of the same year, treasurer of the same cor- 



76 

poration, succeeding his father, who died Dec. 25, 1870. In 
October, 1871, his place of business was removed to No. 120 
Milic Street; in April, 1875, to No. 17 Oliver Street; and in 
November, 1886, to No. 160 High Street. He is engaged in 
the manufacture and sale of steel, iron, and nails, as treasurer 
and agent of the Tremont Nail Company. He resides in 
Wareham. Address. No. 160 High Street, Boston. 

ROBERT NOXON TOPPAN. — Born in Philadelphia, 
Pa., Oct. 17, 1836; son of Charles and Laura A. (Noxon) 
Toppan. After graduation, he began the study of law in the 
office of Messrs. Tracy, Wait & Olmstead, in New York ; 
he also attended the law lectures of Columbia College, from 
which he received the degree of LL. B., in May, i86r. He 
took his degree of A. M. from Harvard the same year. He 
was admitted to the New York bar, June 4, and began prac 
tice at No. 6 Wall Street. He published, about this time, a 
translation of Jouffroy's " Ethics." He sailed for Europe, 
June 25. 1862, and remained there until the spring of 1868. 
He spent the greater part of the time from 1868 to 1880 in 
Europe. He married, Oct. 6, 1880, Sarah M. Cushing, 
daughter of Hon. William Cushing, of Newburyport. After 
being in Europe for some months, resided for a time in 
Newburyport, where a daughter, Laura Noxon, was born 
Nov. 17, 1 88 1. In 1882, moved to Cambridge, which has 
since been his residence, and where a daughter, Fannie 
Cushing, was born Aug. 26, 1883, and a son, Cushing, Nov. 
25, 1886. Belongs to the following societies: Century Club 
of New York, Numismatic and Antiquarian Society of Phila- 
delphia, American Social Science Association (being mem- 
ber of the International Coinage Committee), British Social 
Science Association, International Arbitration Association, 
American Meteorological Society, Dante Society, Historical 
Society of Old Newbury, American Historical Association, 
Massachusetts Reform Club, American Antiquarian Society, 



and American Philosophical Society. Publications have been r 
"The Historical Succession of Monetary Metallic Standards," 
1877; "A Unit of Eight Grammes," 1879; "Some Modern 
Monetary Questions viewed in the Light of Antiquity"; 
"Historical Summary of MetalHc Money," 1884; "Inter- 
national Coinage," 1881; "Brief Biographical Sketches/' 
1885 ; and some other articles. Has recently sailed for 
Europe, Address, 10 Highland Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

JAMES PERCIVAL TOWNSEND. — Born in Boston, 
Feb. 16, 1839; son of Samuel R. and Mary S. (Percival) 
Townsend. After graduation, he was employed as clerk in 
the office of the Register of Probate of Bristol County, in 
Taunton. He enlisted as a private in the Thirty-ninth Massa- 
chusetts Regiment, Aug. 13, 1862. During the greater por- 
tion of his term of service, he was on detached duty as clerk 
in the adjutant-general's office, Washington. His regiment 
was mustered out of service Aug. 27, 1865, and he immediately 
enlisted in the regular service, retaining his place as clerk. 
He was discharged from service Sept. 7, 1866, to accept an 
appointment as first-class clerk in the same office (adjutant- 
general of the War Department). On Aug. 5, 1882, he was 
promoted to a third-class clerkship in the same office ; and 
on Sept. 12, 1882, was married to Elizabeth A. Ringgold, 
of Washington, D. C. Address, War Department, Adjutant- 
General's Office, Washington, D. C. 

JOHN PEARSE TREADWELL. — Born in Ports- 
mouth, N. H., Feb. 26, 1839; son of Daniel H. and Ann 
(Langdon) Tread well. After spending six months in travel- 
ling through the West, he entered the Harvard Law School 
in March, 1859. After spending a year here, he entered 
Judge Sanger's office, in Boston, March i, i860. He was 
admitted to the Suffolk bar in June, i860. He received the 
degree of A. M. in 1861, and that of LL. B. in 1862. He has 



78 

practised law in Boston ever since, his present office being in 
the Sears Building. He has made many vacation trips to 
Europe, the first in 1864 and the last in 1887. He married, 
July 3, 1882, Emily Marshall Harmon, and has children : 
Emily Eustis, born Jan. 9, 1884; Margaret Langdon, born 
Aug. 12, 1885 ; and Helen Tilden, born Sept 4, 1S86. He 
resides on Pembroke Street in Newton. Address, 7 Sears 
Building, Boston. 

*JAMES EDWARD VICKERY. — Born in Taunton, 
Aug. 10, 1838; son of Charles R. Vick6ry. He began the 
study of the law in the office of the Hon. E. H. Bennett, in 
Taunton, Mass., after graduation, and continued it until the 
beginning of the war. He enlisted in the navy as a seaman, 
May 20, 1 861, and was on the steamer Massachusetts, and 
served on blockade duty and in the Gulf of Mexico. In 1862, 
he was on the steamer William Frazier, engaged in trans- 
portation duties near Fortress Monroe. In October, 1862, he 
sailed for Smyrna, and was absent a year. He was admitted 
to the Bristol County (i\Iass.) bar in March, 1863. In the 
spring of 1865, he went to New Berne, N. C; and, in the 
summer of the same year, sailed from New York on a trip 
to Sicily. After his return, he spent some months with a 
saw-mill company in North Carolina. In March, 1867, he 
removed to Missouri, and settled in Neosho, where he con- 
tinued to reside and practise law. He was married, March 
5, 1869, to Anna H. Holton, of West Northfield, Mass. He 
died of consumption, at Neosho, Mo., Jan, 30, 1881. 

HENRY PICKERING WALCOTT. — Born in Hop- 
kinton, Dec. 23, 1838; son of Samuel B. and Martha (Pick- 
man) Walcott. After graduation, he began the study of 
medicine with Drs. Morrill and Jeffries Wyman, in Cambridge. 
He also attended the lectures of the Harvard Medical School. 
In May, 1861, he removed to Bowdoin College, Maine, and 



79 

took his degree of M. D. there. In June, he sailed for Europe, 
and studied in Vienna and Paris until November, 1862, when 
he returned and began to practise his profession in Cambridge. 
In May, 1864, he went to garrison the batteries at Province- 
town, with the Twelfth Unattached Company, Massachu- 
setts Volunteer Militia, in which he was a corporal. His 
term of service expired in August, and he returned to Cam- 
bridge. He was married, May 31, 1865, to Charlotte E., 
daughter of the late Reuben Richards, Esq., of Boston. He 
went with his wife immediately to Europe, and returned in 
July, 1866. He continues the practice of his profession in 
Cambridge. In 1870, he received the Boylston medical prize 
for an essay on " Aphasia." He has two sons : George, born 
Jan. 26, 1871 ; and Robert, born Oct. 17, 1874. A son, Henry, 
was born Oct. 29, 186S, and died Dec. 28 of the same year. 
His wife died Jan. 26, 1879. ^^ July, 1880, was appointed 
health officer of the State Board of Health, Lunacy, and 
Charity. Visited Europe in 1882 for the purpose of exam- 
ining public sanitary works. Was member of the first Met- 
ropolitan Drainage Commission, and of the commission of 
experts to report upon the pollution of Blackstone River. 
Resigned position of health officer in November, 1882, and 
was, in December following, appointed member of the Board 
of Health, Lunacy, and Charity, and has been chairman of the 
Health Committee ever since. Has also been a member of 
the Board of Health of Cambridge since 1876, and for the 
same time city physician ; also member of commission to 
report upon water supply of Cambridge and its future treat- 
ment. Since 1885, has been chairman of the Board of Ex- 
aminers for the Civil Service of the State. Is a Trustee of 
the Cambridge Hospital. Has been an active member of 
the Massachusetts Horticultural Society for years, member 
of the executive committee and frequent exhibitor, and has 
been its president since 1886. Is a member of the American 
Public Heahh Association, chairman of some of its com- 



8o 

mittees, and was its president in 1886. Was elected Overseer 
of Harvard University for term beginning in 1887. Member 
of College Committee on Athletics in 18S6 and 1887. Has 
been chairman of the State Board of Health since 1886. 
Has written a number of public reports upon special topics, 
and an address made before the American Public Health 
Association has been printed separately. Address, Water- 
house Street, Cambridge. 

WINSLOW WARREN. — Born in Plymouth, March 20, 
1838 ; son of Winslow and Margaret (Bartlett) Warren. In 
November, 1858, he commenced the study of the law in the 
office of S. Bartlett, Esq., in Boston. He entered the Har- 
vard Law School in September, 1859, receiving at the same 
time the appointment of proctor in the college. In January, 
1 86 1, he re-entered Mr. Bartlett's office, and March 12 was 
admitted to tne Suffolk bar. He opened an office at No. 16 
Court Street. He received the degree of LL. B. at the Com- 
mencement of this year. In May, 1863, he removed to No. 
35 Court Street. He was appointed United States Commis- 
sioner for Massachusetts, in March, 1864. He was married, 
Jan. 3, 1867, to Mary Lincoln, daughter of Spencer Tink- 
ham, Esq., of Boston. A son, named Charles, was born, 
March 9, 1868; Margaret, born Dec. 16, 1869; Mary Lin- 
coln, born Jan. 14, 1872; and Winslow, born June i, 1878. 
He has continued to practise law in Boston. In 1871, he 
built a house on the banks of the Charles River, in Dedham. 
He is a member of the Massachusetts Historical Society, and, 
from July, 1873, to 1878, was assistant secretary of the Mas- 
sachusetts Society of the Cincinnati ; then treasurer, and 
now vice-president of the same society. Address, 39 Court 
Street, Boston. 

GEORGE ALBERT WENTWORTH. — Born in Wake- 
field, N. H., July 21, 1835 ; son of Edmund and Eliza (Lang) 



8i 

Wentworth. Immediately after graduation, he was appointed 
instructor in Phillips Exeter Academy. He took his degree 
of A. M. in 1 86 1. He was married, Aug. 2, 1864, to Emily 
Johnson, daughter of the late Daniel G. Hatch, Esq., of Cov- 
ington, Ky. He has three children : Ellen Lang, born July 
25, 1865; George, born Jan. 8, 1868; and Edmund Hatch, 
born Sept. 4, 1869. Continues to hold the professorship of 
Mathematics in Phillips Exeter Academy, to which he was 
appointed immediately after graduation. He is the author of 
"Wentworth's Series of Mathematics," consisting of a Primary 
Arithmetic, a Grammar School Arithmetic, a High School 
Arithmetic, Elements of Algebra, Complete Algebra, Col- 
lege Algebra, Plane and Solid Geometry, Analytic Plane and 
Solid Geometry, Plane and Spherical Trigonometry, Survey- 
ing and Navigation, Mathematical Tables, Exercises in Arith- 
metic, Exercises in Algebra, and Exercises in Geometry. 
The series is very widely used. His daughter Ellen grad- 
uates this year from Smith College, his son George is a 
Sophomore in Harvard College, and his son Edmund is a 
Junior in Phillips Exeter Academy. Address, Exeter, N. H. 

SAMUEL HIDDEN WENTWORTH. —Born in Sand- 
wich, N. H., July 16, 1834; son of Paul and Lydia (Cogs- 
well) Wentworth. After graduation, he entered the Harvard 
Law School, from which he received the degree of LL. B. in 
1861. He was admitted to the Suffolk bar, July 6, 1861, and 
opened an office in Boston. Received honorary degree of 
A. M. from Dartmouth College, in 1879. He continues to 
practise law in Boston. He took the degree of A. M. in 1868 
For three years, 1872-74, he was a member of the School 
Committee. Since 1877, he has been a member of the Demo- 
cratic City Central Committee, and has twice (1877, 1878) 
represented Boston in the State Legislature. He is a mem- 
ber of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, 



82 

and served for three years as its secretary. Address, No. 209 
Washington Street, Boston. 

SYDNEY AUGUSTUS WILLIAMS. —Born in Taun- 
ton, Nov. I, 1837; son of Sydney and Caroline D. (Messer) 
Williams. After graduation, he went into business as an in- 
surance agent in Taunton, at first with his father, but after 
1864, alone. He was married, April 13, 1871, to Charlotte S. 
Richardson, of Boston. He continued his business in Taun- 
ton (insurance agency) until April, 1872, when he went to 
Europe, where he remained until September, 1873 > ^•nd where, 
in Vevay, Switzerland, his son, Sydney Messer, was born 
Feb. 5, 1873. After his return, he resumed his business in 
Taunton, but resides in Boston. He is now secretary and 
treasurer of the American Mutual Liability Insurance Co., 
in Boston, and resides at No. 379 Marlboro' Street. Address, 
30 Kilby Street, Boston. 



TEMPORARY MEMBERS. 



JOHN ALBEE was a son of John and Esther (Thayer) 
Albee, and was born in Bellingham, April 3, 1833. He left 
college during our first term, and in September, 1855, re- 
turned to Cambridge to enter the Divinity School, from which 
he was graduated in 1858. He kept up all the studies of the 
class of 1858, save mathematics, and all the lectures, during 
the three years which he spent in the Divinity School. He 
has lived in New Castle, N. H , since April, 1865, and has 
been engaged in literary work. He has published: "Three 
Memorials," in 1878; "St. Aspenquid," in 1879; "Literary 
Art," in 1881 ; " Poems," in 1883 ; " History of New Castle," 
in 1884. He married Miss Harriet Ryan in 1864. She 
died in 1873. His children are: Esther, born in 1866, and 
Louisa Shaw, born in 1869. Address, New Castle, N. H, 

* EDWARD AUGUSTUS BARRETT. — He left col- 
lege during the second term of our Freshman year. His resi- 
sidence then was New Ipswich, N. H. He died there of 
Bright's disease. His wife is also dead. 

RALPH HASTINGS CUTTER.— He left the class in 
January, 1857, for Yale, where he graduated in 1858. Began to 
study law with Rufus Choate, but was forced by ill health to 
give it up, and till 1869 spent the time in New Hampshire in 
quiet reading. Was admitted to practice in 1872 at Nashua, 
N. H., where he practised five years. Went to Bainbridge, 
Ga., to be married to Mrs. Mildred M. Hines, in February, 1878. 



84 

Decided to settle there on account of his health. Has had 
children : John Hastings and Ellen Dickinson, twins, born 
Nov. 29, 1878 ; Raymond Poole, born April, 1881 ; and Ruby 
Hollis, born June 24, 1884, died June, 1886. Has written an 
article on " The Progress of Federal Disorganization," in 1858, 
and in 1873 one on "Political Constitutions," published in the 
December number of the " National Quarterly Review." In 
1883 was made United States Commissioner. Continues to 
practise law, and does some teaching also. Was Professor of 
Latin and English at Dawson College from January to June, 
1886. Address, Bainbridge, Ga. 

*HAZEN DORR. — Born in Boston, Oct. 30, 1836; son 
of Samuel Fo.x and Elizabeth Chipman (Hazen) Dorr. He 
died suddenly in Cambridge, June 7, 1856. 

MORRIS DORR. — He left college during the first term 
of our Freshman year, and has since lived in Boston. Ad- 
dress, 31 Pemberton Square, Boston. 

WILLIAM ELLIOTT. —Born in Beaufort, S. C, Sept. 
3, 1838, He left college at the end of our Sophomore year, 
and entered the University of Virginia. On the catalogue of 
that college for 1S57-5S, his name appears as a student in 
history and literature, and law ; and he was admitted to the bar 
at Charleston in 1861. He entered the Confederate service, 
and served as an officer throughout the war, being for some 
time on the stail^ of Major-General Stephen D. Lee, where he 
served with credit. In 1S66, he was elected a member of the 
Legislature and the Intendant of Beaufort. Was a delegate 
to the Democratic National Convention at St. Louis in 1876, 
and was Democratic Presidential Elector for the State at large 
in 1880. Was Democratic candidate for Congress in 1884, 
and was defeated, but was elected to the Fiftieth Congress in 
November, 18S6. He is a successful lawyer Address, Beau- 
fort, S. C. 



«5 

SAMUEL HOPKINS EMERY, Jr. — Born in Taunton, 
Aug. 3, 1840. He left our class at the end of our Freshman 
year, and entered the Sophomore class of Amherst College, 
of which his father is a graduate. He left Amherst at the 
end of the Sophomore year, and went to Quincy, 111., in the 
spring of 1856, where he was in the stove manufacturing 
business till 1879; then came East, and was in the Harvard 
Law School, 1879-81, and took degree of LL. B. in 1882. 
Received honorary A. M. from Amherst, in 1872. Is now 
practising law in Boston, and living in Concord. Is director 
of the Concord School of Philosophy. Address, 65 Sears 
Building, Boston. 

JOHN BARCLAY FASSITT. — He left our class during 
the second term of our Freshman year, and went into the 
wholesale dry-goods business in Philadelphia. At the break- 
ing out of the war, he was travelling in the South. He 
returned to Philadelphia, and in April, 1861, went out with 
the Philadelphia City Troop, of which he was a member, for 
the three-months' campaign At its close he was mustered 
out, and immediately remustered as second lieutenant. Com- 
pany H, Twenty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers. During the 
three-months' service he was in the battles of Falling Waters 
and Martinsburg with the City Troop. Was promoted first 
lieutenant and adjutant of his regiment, July 2, i86r. Served 
for a time as acting adjutant-general of brigade, but returned 
to his regiment just before they started for the Peninsula 
under General McClellan ; was with it in the march up and 
down the Peninsula, was in the battles of Warwick Creek, 
Williamsburg, Seven Pines, and the seven-days' fighting 
around Richmond. Was promoted captain on the field at 
Malvern Hill, for "gallant and meritorious conduct in the 
face of the enemy." Was in the battles of Chantilly and 
Fredericksburg with his regiment ; then returned to General 
Birney's staff, and was in the battle of Gettysburg and all 



86 

the fights in which the Third Corps was engaged till the 
Grant campaign around Richmond, when he was ordered to 
Washington as president general court martial. Served 
temporarily on the staffs of Generals Stoneman and Sickles. 
At the close of the war came to New York. Was appointed, 
Jan. I, 1883, Chief Deputy United States Marshal for the 
District of Columbia. Was appointed, March i, 1885, Post- 
age Stamp Agent for the United States. Jan. i, 1886, 
resigned to go into business with E. K. Willard & Co., 
bankers and brokers, New York City, where he is now. 
Never was married. He resides at 749 Fifth Avenue. 
Address, 72 Broadway, New York City. 

JOHN LOWELL GARDNER. — He left college during 
the second term of our Sophomore year, and engaged in busi- 
ness in Boston. He was married, April 10, i860, to Isabella 
Stuart, of New York. His son, John Lowell, 3d, died in 
Boston, March 15, 1865, aged twenty-one months. Continues 
to reside in Boston, at No. 152 Beacon Street, and has an 
office at No. 22 Congress Street. Has travelled a good deal 
in different parts of the world, though he has seldom been 
very long away from home. Has been for a number of years 
a director of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad 
Company, and of various factory, insurance, and other corpo- 
rations ; also a Trustee and member of the Finance Committee 
of the Suffolk Savings Bank. He is one of the Trustees and 
Treasurer of the Museum of Fine Arts of Boston, and also 
one of the Trustees of the Humane Society of Massachusetts. 
He is at present in Europe, and writes. May 24, from Madrid. 
Address, No. 22 Congress Stieet, Boston. 

* JAMES WILDER GATES. —He left our class at the 
end of our Freshman year, and entered the Sophomore class 
of Dartmouth College. He was graduated in 1858, and 
went to Cardenas, Cuba, to engage in mercantile pursuits. 



87 

His health failed, and he returned to his home in Cambridge, 
where he died Feb. 24, 1863. 

* WILLIAM GIBBONS. — Born in Philadelphia, Jan. 16, 
1834; son of William and Abby (Hopper) Gibbons. He en- 
tered our class at the beginning of our Sophomore year. On 
the evening of Dec. 15, 1855, as he was walking out from 
Boston, he stumbled over some obstacle, and fell violently to 
the ground. He rose, and felt no immediate injury from his 
fall ; but the next day was troubled with sharp pain and dizzi- 
ness ; hemorrhage from the stomach followed, and, on the 
following day, Dec. 17, he died. An interesting memoir 
of Gibbons, prepared by Rev. Theodore Tebbets, was printed 
for his friends, and copies of it were sent to the members of 
the class by his mother. 

HERSEY BRADFORD GOODWIN. —In the winter of 
1855-56 he left college on account of ill health, and Jan. 23 
sailed from New York for Melbourne. The vessel, after dis- 
charging her cargo there, went to Batavia, and thence to Sin- 
gapore. Here Goodwin left her, and returned home in another 
vessel, reaching Boston in November, 1856. He then entered 
the counting-room of Mr. R. C. Mackay, afterwards Messrs. 
R. C. Mackay & Son, in Boston. In January, 1859, ^^ sailed 
again for the East as supercargo and agent of the ship Dol- 
phin. He spent several months in Batavia, Singapore, and 
Penang, and returned by the overland route to England, in 
January, i860. After a visit to the West, he remained 
quietly at his home in Boston in poor health. He suffered 
much from an insidious disease caused by his residence in a 
tropical climate, and was unable to undertake any regular 
work. In the autumn of 1862, he joined the paymaster's 
department of the army, and was stationed at New York. In 
June, 1863, his health having improved, he decided to return 
to active business, and, after spending some time in his former 



88 

office, started for Calcutta, via England, in February, 1S64. 
Here he was established as a commission agent until March, 
1866. His life was varied only by a journey into the interior 
of India. He returned to America by way of Egypt, Palestine, 
and Europe, and reached Boston in August, 1 866. He formed a 
copartnership with Mr. Frank Plodgkinson, for the transaction 
of a general commission business, Jan. i, 1867. The style of 
the firm was Hodgkinson & Goodwin. During the winter 
of 1868 he made a business visit to Cuba In January, 
1869, Mr. J. H. Locke was admitted a partner into the firm 
of Hodgkinson & Goodwin ; and in August of the same year, 
Mr. Hodgkinson retiring, the firm name was changed to Good- 
win, Locke & Co. They continued the commission business, 
dealing chiefly in flour, grain, and lumber. In October, 1875^ 
they opened a branch house in New York, for the transaction 
of a similar business at that point. In June, 1871, Goodwin 
married Ellen C, daughter of the late Hon. Thomas Hopkin- 
son, of Cambridge, and has since resided in that place. In 
the spring of 1875, he made a short trip to Europe for the 
benefit of his health. He has children : Amelia Mackay, 
born June, 1872; Elliot Hersey, born January, 1874; Grace 
Mary, born February, 1876; Francis Hopkinson, born in 
June, 1883, but lived only five weeks ; and Frances Barnard, 
born in July, 1885. In 1876 was chosen a Trustee of the Cam- 
bridge Public Library. In 1879 was elected a director of the 
Merchandise National Bank. In March, 1880, was elected 
president of the Boston Commercial Exchange, and re-elected 
in 1 88 1. In January, 1881, the firm of Goodwin, Locke & 
Co. was dissolved, and he continued the Boston business 
under the name of H. B. Goodwin & Co. He was chosen 
president of the new Boston Chamber of Commerce in 1885, 
and again in 1886. In 1886, made a trip to England for rest 
and change. He continues to reside in Cambridge. His 
address is No. 15 India Street, Boston. 



89 

GEORGE HUNTLY GORDON.— He entered our class 
at the beginning of the second term of our Freshman year, 
and left it to engage in business during the second term of 
our next year. Has lived in Boston most of the time since 
then. 

GEORGE FREDERICK GRANGER — He left our 
class in July, 1855, and entered the Sophomore class of Bow- 
doin College. He did not remain more than one year there. 
He received a commission as first lieutenant in the Ninth 
Maine Volunteers, Sept. 21, 1862. He was promoted to cap- 
tain, Sept. 23, and to major, June 23, 1863. He was wounded 
in the engagement at Drury's Bluff, May 16, 1864. He was 
commissioned lieutenant-colonel of his regiment, June 6, 
1864; colonel, Sept. 13, 1864; and brevetted brigadier-gen- 
eral, June 15, 1865. The regiment was maistered out of ser- 
vice, July 13, 1865. He returned home, and engaged in the 
study of the law, at Calais, Maine. 

WILLIAM PAYNE HALL.— He left college at the end 
of our Sophomore year, and went into business at Davenport, 
Iowa. He returned to Boston in i86r, and went into busi- 
ness with Messrs. T. K. Cummins & Co, The firm was dis- 
solved Jan. I, 1869, and a new one, under the same style, 
formed for commission business in Boston and New York, 
Hall took charge of the New York house. This firm was 
dissolved in 1873, and he began business in Boston for him- 
self, as a broker in dyes and drugs, at No. 40 Kilby Street, 
He was married, June 10, 1863, to Susan P., daughter of 
James H. Blake, of Boston, and has children : Maria Hallett, 
born in May, 1864; Joseph Bartlett, born in January, 1869 ; 
and Susan Blake, born in February, 1877, He lost two chil- 
dren in infancy. He resides in Milton. Address, 1 1 Central 
Street, Boston. 



90 

* GEORGE CHANDLER HATHAWAY.— He left our 
-class at the end of our Sophomore year, and entered the Ju 
nior class of Tufts College. From an examination of the cat- 
alogues, he would seem to have left Tufts at the end of his 
Junior year. In May, 1861, he was heard from in Vermont. 
He was then practising law in Rutland, and was married. 
His wife was Miss Dana, of Woodstock, Vt. Died suddenly, 
at the Grand Central Hotel, New York, May 31, 1871. His 
wife and child had died previously. He was agent in New 
York for a marble quarry in Rutland. 

* HENRY JACKSON HOW.— He left our class during 
the first term of our Freshman year, and re-entered college 
in the class of 1859, with which he was graduated. He 
studied medicine for a short time, and then, preferring a 
more active employment, engaged in business in his native 
town, Haverhill. After the fall of Fort Sumter, he raised one 
of the first companies, and was unanimously chosen its cap- 
tain. The company was joined to the Fourteenth Massachu- 
setts Regiment, and ordered to Fort Warren. Here, How 
was for some time senior officer ; but after the arrival of the 
colonel, an unfortunate controversy arose, and he was super- 
seded. He was commissioned major in the Nineteenth Mas- 
sachusetts, Aug. 3, 1 86 1. He distinguished himself in the 
battle of Ball's Bluff, and captured the only prisoners taken 
in that affair. In the battle of Glendale, June 30, 1862, he 
received a mortal wound, and died after about two hours' 
suffering. 

JAMES JAMIESON.— He left our class during the first 
term of our Freshman year, and entered the University of 
New York. His residence then was Boston. The Secretary 
has been unable to trace him further. 

^ BENJAMIN DEWEES MARSHALL JONES.— He 
left our class during the second term of our Junior year, and 



91 

returned to Virginia. He was marrieil before the war broke 
out, and had a plantation near Petersburg. He lost his prop- 
erty during the war, and in 1879 was living in Bellefonte, Va. 
He had three children. 

HENRY LAWRENCE.— He left our class during the 
second term of the Freshman year, and entered the class of 
1859 *o^ ^ short time, but he soon left on account of poor 
health, and went to Europe for a few months. Returning, was 
with Jewett, Tebbetts & Co. till the spring of 1857. Sailed 
for Melbourne, Australia, putting in at Rio Janeiro on the way 
with a cargo of lumber consigned to the house of Newell, 
Hooper & Stevens, with whom he remained till the news of 
the failure of his father's house, Lawrence, Stone & Co., com- 
pelled him to seek other employment. For a few weeks he 
drove a team of six horses from Melbourne to Bendiga, and 
then a coach on the same route. He next traded in horses, 
cattle, and sheep, driving them overland to Sydney, Melbourne, 
and other markets. He returned via England after an ab- 
sence of six years. He was in business with his father, then 
for a short time was with D. Appleton & Co , whom he left in 
1 87 1. Since then has devoted himself to etching, drawing, 
and sketching. June 26, 1871, married Marie Therise, 
daughter of Dr Joseph Mauran, of Providence, R. I. He has 
no children. Lived in New York City for some years, but 
for the last fourteen years has lived in Brooklyn. Address, 
128 Livingston Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

WILLIAM HENRY FITZHUGH LEE. — Born in 
Virginia, May 31, 1837; second son of Gen. Robert E. 
Lee. Left college during the second term of our Junior year 
to accept a commission in the United States Army, which he 
resigned in 1859 ^o ^e married, and was living on his planta- 
tion, "The White House," New Kent County, Va., when 



92 

Virginia passed the ordinance of secession. He then joined 
the Confederate Army, raised a company of cavalry, and was 
promoted until he became a major-general of cavalry. He 
was attached to the cavalry of the Army of Northern Vir^ 
ginia. In June, 1863, he was taken prisoner and confined in 
Fortress Monroe. In November, he was sent to Fort La- 
fayette, N. Y. In December, 1863, his wife died in Rich- 
mond. He was exchanged in 1864 for General Neal Dow. 
He was married in Petersburg, Nov. 27, 1867, to Mary Tabb, 
daughter of the Hon. Geo. W. Boiling, of Petersburg. He 
lived at the " White House " after the war until 1874, when 
he moved to "Ravensworth," where he now lives. Since the 
war he has been in the Virginia Senate. He is extensively 
interested in agriculture, and has been president of the Vir- 
ginia State Agricultural Society. He has two children, both 
boys. He is a member of the House of Representatives 
in the Fiftieth Congress. Address, Ravensworth, Burke's 
Station P. O., Fairfax County, Va. 

FRANCIS LEWIS LOWNDES. — He entered our 
class at the beginning of the second term of our Freshman 
year, and left during the second term. Junior year. He had 
intended to enter commercial life, but the sudden death of 
his uncle, Mortimer Livingston, Esq., in whose office a situ- 
ation was offered him, and the financial crisis of the period 
(1857), prevented his carrying out his plans. After a year 
spent in leisure and desultory reading, he commenced the 
study of the law in the ofifice of Alexander Hamilton, Jr., Esq., 
in New York. He also attended the law lectures of Columbia 
College, from which he received the degree of LL. B. in 
1 861. He was admitted to the bar, by examination, in May 
of that year, and practised his profession in New York. He 
retired from business in 1880, and lives in New York City. 
Address, No. 145 West Fourteenth Street, New York. 



93 

CHARLES DOMINIQUE SPRAGUE. — He left our 
class during our Freshman year, and is supposed to have en- 
gaged in business. His residence then was Gilbraltar, Spain, 

* FREDERICK WILLIAMS STANWOOD. — He left 
college at the end of the first term of our Sophomore year, and 
returned to his home in New Hampshire. Here he spent 
several years in comparative leisure, in order to re-establish 
his health, which was not good. He was appointed town 
clerk of Hopkinton, in October, 1859, ^^ fill a vacancy, and 
elected to the of^ce in March, i860. He resigned it in Jan- 
uary, 1 86 1, and made a visit to the West. Returning home 
to spend the summer, he made another visit the next winter. 
Finally, in October, 1863, he removed to Chicago, and ac- 
cepted the situation of chief clerk in the freight department 
of the Chicago and Milwaukee Railroad. This he retained 
until May, 1865, when the railway was leased to the Chicago 
and Northwestern Company, and he was appointed ticket 
agent of the Milwaukee division of that road, and of the Co- 
lumbus, Chicago and Indiana Central Railroad His health 
failed after the great fire in Chicago of 1871, and he went to 
California, and then returned to Hopkinton, N. H., where he 
died of consumption, Jan. 24, 1877. 

GEORGE TOLMAN. — He left college in April, 1857, and 
after travelling in the West a short time, accepted a situation 
in the freight office of the Michigan Central Railroad, in 
Detroit. He made a visit to New England in 1858, and at- 
tended the Commencement of the class. Soon afterwards 
he removed to Toledo, O., and was employed in the freight 
department of the Wabash and Western Railroad. He re- 
turned to New England about December, 1858. He accepted 
a clerkship in the Boston and Worcester Railroad office, April 
I, 1859. He resigned this, and entered the office of the New 
England Farmer newspaper. He was married, June 12, 1861, 



94 

to Lizzie B. Adams, of Concord. He resides in Concord, of 
which town he has twice been selectman. He had previously 
lived in Dorchester. He has had five children : Adams, born 
in Boston, April 15, 1862; Mary Mayo, born in Concord, 
Oct. 8, 1863, and died in Northfield, Vt., July 31, 1866; Wil- 
liam Nichols, born in Dorchester, Nov. 2, 1867 ; Charles Ed- 
ward, born in Concord, Sept. 12, 1871 ; and James Henry, 
born in Concord, Aug. 29, 1876. He remained with the New 
England Farmer till February, 1886, and since then has been 
engaged in literary work. Address, Concord, Mass. 

ALONZO CLAUDIUS WHITRIDGE. — He left our 
class during the first term of our Sophomore year, and en- 
tered Union College. From this he was graduated in 1858. 

WALTER HASTINGS WOODS. — He left the class dur- 
ing the first term of our Freshman year. His residence then 
was Framingham, Mass. 

LEIGH RICHMOND WORCESTER. — His name ap- 
pears upon the catalogue of our first term, but he had no room 
in Cambridge. His residence was Ipswich, Mass. 



THE CLASS AS UNDERGRADUATES. 



[Reprinted from the First Term Catalogues.] 



FRESHMEN. 



1854-55. 



Abercrombie, Otis Putnam, 
Adams, Henry Brooks, 
Albee, John, 
Allen, Charles Adams, 
Allen, Gideon, 
Ames, Fisher, 

Anderson, Nicholas Longworth, 
Barrett, Edward Augustus, 
Bartlett, Wm. Pitt Greenwood, 
Beals, Joshua Gardner, 
Bigelow, Alanson, 
Bliss, Eugene Frederic, 
Bradbury, Charles Brooks, 
Bradlee, Josiah, 
Brick, Riley Allen, 
Bromberg, Frederic George, 
Brown, Benjamin Graves, 
Burgess, George Canning, 
Burt, John Otis, 
Cabot, Louis, 

Chadwick, George Bradford, 
Cilley, Jonathan Longfellow, 
Cobb, John Edward, 
Crosby, George Washington, 
Crowninshield, Benj. William, 
Damon, Howard Franklin, 
Dexter, George, 
Dorr, Hazen, 
Dorr, Morris, 



RESIDENCE. 
Lunenburg, 
Quit icy, 
Grafton, 
Cambridge, 
New Bedford, 
Cambridge, 
Cincinnati, Ohio, 
Neiu Ipszvich, N. H. 
Boston, 
Boston, 
Cambridge, 
Worcester, 
Brookline, 
Boston, 

New York,N. F. 
Mobile, Ala. 
Marblehead, 
Kingston, 
Syracuse, N. Y. 
Brookline, 
Boston, 

Cincinnati, Ohio, 
Sandivich, 
Leominster, 
Boston, 
Boston, 

Cincinnati, Ohio, 
Boston, 
Boston y 



Mr. T. J. Whittemore's. 

Mrs. P. L. Story's 

S. 17 

Miss E. Dana's 

Mrs. A. C. Fairbank's 

H'y9 

Mr. H. C. Gale's 

Mr. L. S. Jones's 

H'y 18 

Misses Upham's 

Miss E. Dana's 

Mr. D. S. Buck's 

H. 17 

Mr. O. Danforth's 

H'y 9 

S. I 

H. 17 

Mrs. L. Stickney's 

Mr. A. Stedman's 

Mrs. S. Humphrey's 

Mrs. S. Humphrey's 

Mr. L. Thurston's 

H'y I 

H. 2 

Dr. S. Plympton's 

Mrs. E. Stewart's 

Miss E. M. Freeman's. 

Mrs. S. Humphrey's 

H. 18 



96 



NAMES. 

Dunning, William Hale, 
Edes, Robert Thaxter, 
Eells, Samuel Henry, 
Eliot, Paul Mitchell, 
Elliott, William, 
Emery, Samuel Hopkins, 
Fassitt, John Barclay, 
Fette, William Eliot, 
Foote, Henry Wilder, 
Fox, William Henry, 
Francis, George Ebenezer, 
Frost, Henry Walker, 
Gardner, John Lowell, 
Gates, James Wilder, 
Gilbert, Horatio James, 
Goodwin, Hersey Bradford, 
Goodwin, Ozias, 
Gordon, William Gilchrist, 
Granger, George Frederick, 
Green, Samuel Swett, 
Hall, James Stevenson, 
Hall, William Payne, 
Hartwell, Alfred Stedman, 
Hathaway, George Chandler, 
Hawes, Marcus Morton, 
Holbruok, Daniel, 
Homans, John, 
How, Henry Jackson, 
Hunnewell, Hollis, 
Jamieson, James, 
Jones, Benj. Dewees Marshall, 
Kimball, Edward Harrington, 
Lamson, Ansel, 
Lawrence, Henry, 
Learoyd, Charles Henry, 
Lee, William Fitzhugh, 
Lowell, James Jackson, 
Magoun, Thatcher, 
Milton, William Frederick, 
Murdock, Seth Miller, 
Myrick, John Dole, 
Norcross, Frederic Malcolm, 
Noyes, John Buttrick, 
Park, John Gray, 
Pasco, Samuel, 
Patten, Henry Lyman, 
Payne, Daniel Chamberlain, 



RESIDENCE. 

Boston, 

Bolton, 

Boston, 

New Bedford, 

Beaufort, S. C. 

Taunton, 

Philadelphia, Pa, 

Cambridge, 

Salem, 

Taunton, 

Lowell, 

Concord, 

Boston, 

Cambridge, 

Taunton, 

Concord, 

Boston, 

N'eiv Bedford, 

Calais, jile. 

Worcester, 

Troy, A''. Y. 

Boston, 

South Natick, 

Plymouth, 

Boston, 

Cambridge, 

Boston, 

Haverhill, 

Boston, 

Boston, 

Petersburg, Va. 

Bradford, 

Lunenburg, Vt. 

Boston. 

North Danvers, 

Arlington, Va. 

Cat)ibridge, 

Medford, 

yamaica Plain, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Augusta, Me. 

Lowell, 

Cambridge, 

Groton, 

Charlestown, 

Boston, 

Boston, 



ROOMS. 

H'y i8 
H. 19 

Mr. J. A. Belcher's 

H'y I 

Dr. S. Plympton's 

S. 2 

Mr. C. Brooks's 

S. I 

H.I 

S. 2 

D-S 

H.3 

Mr. H. C. Gale's 

H. 20 

M. 9 

H.3 

Mr. W. Warland's 

S.3 

Miss H. C. Bowman's 

Mr. D. S. Buck's 

S. 17 

Dr. S. Plympton's 

Mrs. S. W. Gannett's 

Mr. D. Brown's 

Mrs. S. W. Gannett's 

Mr. D. Holbrook's 

Dr. S. Plympton's 

Mrs. Morrison's 

Dr. S. Plympton's 

Mrs. Morrison's 

Misses Howe's 

H. 2 

Dr. S. Plympton's 

Mrs. E. C. Upham's 

Mr. W. Mills's 

M. 16 

Mr. C. R. Lowell's 

Mrs. A. H. Harris's 

Dr. S. Plympton's 

Mr. L. Thurston's 

Mr. H. M. Beals's 

Mr. D. Brown's 

Dr. G. R. Noyes's 

H. 18 

Rev. J. A. Kendall's 

M. 25 

Misses Upham's 



97 



NAMES. 
Phillips, John Charles, 
Pond, George Edward, 
Richardson, Henry Augustus, 
Sawyer, Amory Pollard, 
Sprague, Charles Dominique, 
Spur, Thomas Jefferson, 
Stanwood, Frederick Williams, 
Stoddard, John Thomas, 
Swinerton, John Putnam, 
Thurber, James Danforth, 
Tobey, Gerard Curtis, 
Tobey, Horace Pratt, 
Tolman, George, 
Townsend, James Percival, 
Vickery, James Edward, 
Walcott, Henry Pickering, 
Warren, Winslow, 
Wentworth, Samuel Hidden, 
Williams, Sydney Augustus, 
Woods, Walter Hastings, 
Worcester, Leigh Richmond, 



RESIDENCE. 


ROOMS. 


Methuen, 


Mrs. S. Humphrey's 


Boston, 


M. 14 


Cambridge, 


Mr. R. Torry's 


Bolton, 


H. 19 


Gibraltar, Spain, 


Dr. S. Plympton's 


Worcester, 


Miss E. Dana's 


Hopkinton, N. H. 


Miss H. C. Bowman's 


Plymouth, 


Mr. J. Bartlett's 


Taunton, 


M. 30 


Plymouth, 


H.4 


Wareham, 


Mr. L. Thurston's 


Wareham, 


Mr. L. Thurston's 


Concord, 


S. I 


Taunton, 


S.3 


Taunton, 


S.4 


Salem, 


H. I 


Plymouth, 


H.4 


Concord, N. H. 


Mrs. M. D. Wells's 


Taunton, 


D. 29 


Framingham, 


Mrs. E. Stewart's 


Ipswich, 


Ipswich 



Freshmen, 97. 



98 



SOPHOMORES 

1855-56. 



NAMES. 

Abercrombie, Otis Putnam, 
Adams, Henry Brooks, 
Allen, Charles Adams, 
Allen, Gideon, 
Ames, Fisher, 

Anderson, Nicholas Longworth, 
Bartlett, Wm. Pitt Greenwood, 
Beals, Joshua Gardner, 
Bigelow, Alanson, 
Bliss, Eugene Frederic, 
Bradbury, Charles Brooks, 
Bradlee, Josiah, 
Brick, Riley Allen, 
Bromberg, Frederic George, 
Brown, Benjamin Graves, 
Burgess, George Canning, 
Burt, John Otis, 
Cabot, Louis, 

Chadwick, George Bradford, 
Cilley, Bradbury Longfellow, 
Cilley, Jonathan Longfellow, 
Cobb, John Edward, 
Crosby, George Washington, 
Crowninshield, Benj. William, 
Cutter, Ralph Hastings, 
Damon, Howard Franklin, 
Davis, James Clarke, 
Dexter, George, 
Door, Hazen, 
Dunning, William Hale, 
Edes, Robert Thaxter, 
Eells, Samuel Henry, 
Eliot, Paul Mitchell, 
Elliott, William, 
Fette, William Eliot, 
Foote, Henry Wilder, 



RESIDENCE. 


ROOMS. 


Lunenburg, 


M. 28 


Quincy, 


Mrs. P. L. Story's 


Cambridge, 


H.32 


NeT.v Bedford, 


M. 28 


Catfibridge, 


Mr. S. Ames's 


Cincinnati, Ohio, 


Mrs. M. W. Qeveland's- 


Boston, 


H.31 


Boston, 


M. 24 


Cambridge, 


M. 29 


Worcester, 


M. 12 


Boston, 


Mrs. M. W. Qeveland's 


Boston, 


Mr. 0. Danforth's 


New York, N. Y. 


H.32 


Mobile, Ala. 


Mrs. M. W. Cleveland's 


Alarblehead, 


H.30 


Kingston, 


Mrs. L. Stickney's 


Syracuse, N. Y. 


M. 22 


Brookline, 


Mrs. S. Humphrey's 


Boston, 


Mrs. S. Humphrey's 


Exeter, N. H. 


Mr. H. M. Beals's 


Cincinnati, Ohio, 


8.13" 


Sandwich, 


M. 16 


Leominster, 


H. 14 


Boston, 


Mr. V. H. Hewes's 


Louisville, Ky. 


Mr. D. S. Buck's 


Boston, 


H.30 


Greenfield, 


H. 20 


Cincinnati, Ohio, 


Miss E. M. Freeman's 


Boston, 


Mrs. S. Humphrey's 


Boston, 


H.31 


Bolton, 


H. 16 


Boston, 


M. 24 


Neiv Bedford, 


S. 8 • 


Beaufort, S. C. 


Dr. S. Plympton's 


Cambridge, 


Mrs. M. W. Cleveland's 


Salem, 


D. 23 



99 



NAMES. 

Fox, William Henry, 

Prancis, George Ebenezer, 

Frost, Henry Walker, 

Fuller, Simon Greenleaf, 

Gardner, John Lowell, 

Gelston, Robert Bruce, 

Gibbons, William, 

Gilbert, Horatio James, 

Goodwin, Hersey Bradford, 

Goodwin, Ozias, 

Gordon, George Huntly, 

Gordon, William Gilchrist, 

Green, Samuel Swett, 

Hall, James Stevenson, 

Hall, William Payne, 

Hartwell, Alfred Stedman, 

Hathaway, George Chandler, 

Haven, Alfred Houston, 

Hawes, Marcus Morton, 

Holbrook, Daniel, 

Homans, John, 

Hunnewell, Hollis, 

Jones, Benj. Dewees Marshall, 

Kilbourn, William Arthur, 

Kimball, Edward Harrington, 

Lamson, Ansel, 

Learoyd, Charles Henry, 

Lee, William Fitzhugh, 

Lowell, James Jackson, 

Lowndes, Francis Lewis, 

Magoun, Thatcher, 

Mason, Edward Bromfield, 

May, James, 

Milton, William Frederick, 

Murdock, Seth Miller, 

Myrick, John Dole, 

Noble, George Washington Copp, 

Norcross, Frederick Malcolm, 

Noyes, John Buttrick, 

Park, John Gray, 

Pasco, Samuel, 

Patten, Henry Lyman, 

Payne, Daniel Chamberlain, 

Phillips, Jcfhn Charles, 

Pond, George Edward, 

Richardson, Henry Augustus, 

Russell, Nathaniel, 



RESIDENCE, 

Taunton. 

Lowell, 

Concord, 

Andover, 

Boston, 

Baltimore, Md. 

New York, N. Y. 

Taunton, 

Concord, 

Boston, 

Boston, 

New Bedford, 

Worcester, 

Troy, N. Y. 

Boston, 

South Natick, 

Plymouth, 
Portsmouth, N. H. 

Boston, 

Cambridge, 

Boston, 
Boston, 
Petersburg, Va. 

Groton, 
Bradford, 
Lunenburg, Vt. 
North Danvers, 
Arlington, Va. 

Cambridge, 
Netv York, N. Y. 
Medford, 
Boston, 

Petersburg, Va. 
Jamaica Plain, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Augusta, Me. 
Sotnersworth, N. H. 
Lowell, 
Cambridge, 
Groton, 
Charlestoivn, 
Boston, 
Boston, 
Methuen, 
Boston, 
Cambridge, 
Plymouth, 



ROOMS. 

S. 24 
D. 14 
M. 13 
D. n 

Mr. W. Warland's 

Mrs. S. Snow's 

S. 30 

M. 9 

M. 13 

Mr. W. Warland's 

Rev. C. A. Farley's 

S. 8 

Mr. J. B. Kent's 

Mrs. A. H. Harris's 

Mr. W. Warland's 

S. 30 

H. 28 

M. 10 

M. 22 

Mr. D. Holbrook's 

Dr. S. Plympton's 

Mrs. S. Snow's 

Miss E. M. Freeman's 

H. 18 

H. 14 

Dr. S. Plympton's 

S. 32 

M. 6 

Mr. C. R. Lowell's 

Miss E. M. Freeman's 

Mrs. A. H. Harris's 

Mr. W. Saunders's 

Mrs. M, Jaques's 

Dr. S. Plympton's 

S. 18 

H. 6 

H. 20 

H. 28 

Rev. Dr. Noyes's 

H. 18 

Mr. J. Pasco's 

s. 32. 

iiarvard Block 
Mrs. S. Humphrey's 
M. 8 
H. 10 
H. 26 



lOO 



NAMES. 

'Sawyer, Amory Pollard, 
Shaw, Joseph Alden, 
iSpurr, Thomas Jefferson, 
:Stanwood, Frederick Williams, 
:Stoddard, John Thomas, 
Swinerton, John Putnam, 
Thurber, James Danforth, 
Tobey, Gerard Curtis, 
Tobey, Horace Pratt, 
Tolman, George, 
Toppan, Robert Noxon, 
Townsend, James Percival, 
Treadwell, John Pearse, 
Vickery, James Edward, 
Walcott, Henry Pickering, 
Warren, Winslow, 
Wentworth, George Albert, 
Wentworth, Samuel Hidden, 
Whitridge, Alonzo Claudius, 
Williams, Sydney Augustus, 



■ RESIDENCE. 




ROOMS. 


Bolton, 




H. i6 


Stidbuiy, 




S. I 


Worcester-, 




Mrs. A. H. Harris's 


Hopkinton, A' 


H. 


M. 29 


Plymouth, 




H. 26 


Taunton, 




M. 30 


Plymouth, 




H. 8 


Wareham, 




H. 12 


Wareham, 




H. 12 


Concord, 




S. 22 


Philadelphia, 


Pa. 


S. 18 


Taunton, 




S. 24 


Portsmouth, A 


\H. 


Mr. J. Bartlett's 


Taunton, 




S. 22 


Salem, 




M. 14 


Plymouth, 




H. 8 


Wakefield, A'. 


H. 


S. I 


Concord, A'. H. 


Mrs. M. D. Wells's 


Charleston, S. 


C. 


Mr. T. J. White's 


Taunton, 




s. 13 



Sophomores, 103. 



lOI 



J 


UNIORS. 

1856-57. 




NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


ROOMS. 


Abercrombie, Otis Putnam, 


Lunenburg, 


M. 28 


Adams, Henry Brooks, 


Quincy, 


H'ys 


Allen, Charles Adams, 


Cambridge, 


H.32 


Allen, Gideon, 


Ne'iU Bedford, 


M. 28 


Ames, Fisher, 


Cambridge, 


Mr. S. Ames's 


Anderson, Nicholas Longworth 


Cincinnati, 0. 


H. II 


Bartlett, Wm. Pitt Greenwood, 


Boston, 


H.31 


Beals, Joshua Gardner, 


Boston, 


Mrs. B. Buxton's 


Bigelow, Alanson, 


Cambridge, 


Mr. A. Bigelow's 


Bliss, Eugene Frederick, 


yatiesville. Wis. 


H'y 10 


Bradbury, Charles Brooks, 


Boston, 


D. I 


Bradlee, Josiah, 


Boston, 


Mr. 0. Danforth's 


Brick, Riley Allen, 


New York, N. Y. 


H.32 


Bromberg, Frederic George, 


Mobile, Ala. 


Mrs. J. Tuttle's 


Brown, Benjamin Graves, 


Alarblehead, 


H'y 2 


Burgess, George Canning, 


Kingston, 


Mrs. L. Stickney's 


Burt, John Otis, 


Syracuse, N. Y. 


S. 30 


Cabot, Louis, 


Brookline, 


H.9 


Chadwick, George Bradford, 


Boston, 


Mrs. S. Humphrey's 


Cilley, Bradbury Longfellow, 


Exeter, N. H. 


S. 28. 


Cilley, Jonathan Longfellow, 


Cincinnati, Ohio. 


S.23 


Cobb, John Edward, 


Sandwich, 


M. II 


Crosby, George Washington, 


Leominster, 


H. 22 


Crowninshield, Benj. William, 


Boston, 


H.9 


Cutter, Ralph Hastings, 


Louisville, Ky. 


Plympton's Block 


Damon, Howard Franklin, 


Boston, 


H'y 2 


Davis, James Clarke, 


Greenfield, 


S.27 


Dexter, George, 


Cincinnati, Ohio, 


Misses Upham's 


Dunning, William Hale, 


Cambridge, 


H.31 


Edes, Robert Thaxter, 


Bolton, 


H. 29 


Eells, Samuel Henry, 


Boston, 


M. 24 


Eliot, Paul Mitchell, 


New Bedford, 


S. 26 


Fette, William Eliot, 


Cambridge, 


Mrs. J. Tuttle's 


Foote, Henry Wilder, 


Salem, 


H. 14 


Fox, William Henry, 


Taunton, 


S. 24 


Francis, George Ebenezer, 


Lowell, 


M. 29 



I02 



NAMES. 
Frost, Henry Walker, 
Fuller, Simon Greenleaf, 
Gelston, Robert Bruce, 
Gilbert, Horatio James, 
Goodwin, Ozias, 
Gordon, William Gilchrist, 
Green, Samuel Swett, 
Hall, James Stevenson, 
Hartwell, Alfred Stedman, 
Haven, Alfred Houston, 
Hawes, Marcus Morton, 
Holbrook, Daniel, 
Homans, John, 
Hunnewell, HoUis, 
Jones, Benj. Dewees Marshall, 
Kilbourn, William Arthur, 
Kimball, Edward Harrington, 
Lamson, Ansel, 
Learoyd, Charles Henry, 
Lee, William Fitzhugh, 
Lowell, James Jackson, 
Lowndes, Francis Lewis, 
Magoun, Thatcher, 
Mason, Edward Bromfield, 
May, James, 

Milton, W^illiam Frederick, 
Murdock, Seth 'Miller, 
Myrick, John Dole, 
Noble, George Washington Copp, 
Norcross, Frederick Malcolm, 
Noyes, John Buttrick, 
Park, John Gray, 
Patten, Henry Lyman, 
Payne, Daniel Chamberlain, 
Phillips, John Charles, 
Pond, George Edward, 
Porter, Edward Griffin, 
Richardson, Henry Augustus, 
Russell, Nathaniel, 
Sawyer, Amory Pollard, 
Shaw, Joseph Alden, 
Shorey, Frank Howard, 
Spurr, Thomas Jefferson, 
Stoddard, John Thomas, 
Swinerton, John Putnam, 
Thurber, James Danforth, 
Tobey, Gerard Curtis, 



RESIDENCE. 

Concord, 
Andover, 
Baltimore, Md. 
Tatititon, 
Boston, 
Neiu Bedford, 
Worcester, 
Troy, N. Y. 
South Natick, 
Portsmouth, N. H. 
Boston, 
Cambridge, 
Boston, 
Boston, 

Petersburg, Fa. 
Grot on, 
Bradford, 
Lunerbit,rg, Vt. 
North Danvers, 
Arlington, Va. 
Cambridge, 
New York, N. Y. 
Medford, 
Boston, 

Petersburg, Va. 
yamaica Plain, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Augusta, Me. 
Somersivorth, N. H. 
Lowell, 
Cambridge, 
Groton, 
Boston, 
Boston, 
Methiten, 
Boston, 
Dorchester, 
Cambridge, 
Plymouth, 
Bolton, 
Sudbury, 
Dedham, 
Worcester, 
Plymouth, 
Taunton, 
Plymouth, 
Wareham, 



ROOMS. 
M. 13 
H. 28 
M. 13 
M. 9 

Mr. W. Warland's 
S. 26 

Mr. J. B. Kent's 
M. 25 

S.30 

M. 31 

Mrs. L. Stickney's 

Mr. D. Holbrook's 

Mr. O. Danforth's 

H'yS 

Miss E. M. Freeman's 

S.9 

H. 22 

Misses Howe's 

S. 32 

M. II 

Mr. C. R. Lowell's 

Miss E. M. freeman's 

M. 25 

Mr. W. Saunders's 

Mrs. M. Jaques's 

Plympton's Block 

S. 23 

S. 20 

S. 27 

H. 28 

Rev. Dr. Noyes's 

S.9 

S. 32 

Mr. W. Warland's 

Mrs. S. Humphrey's 

M. 29 

M. 6 

H. ID 

H'y 17 

H. 29 

D. I 

Mr. M. Webb's 

H'y ID 

H. 27 

S. 20 

S.5 

H. 12 



I03 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 




ROOMS. 


Tobey, Horace Pratt, 


Wareham, 


H. 12 




Tolman, George, 


Concord, 


S. 22 




Toppan, Robert Noxon, 


New York, N. V. 


Miss. E. 


M. Freeman's 


Townsend, James Percival, 


Taunton, 


S. 24 • 




Treadwell, John Pearse, 


Portsmouth, N. H. 


H'yi7 




Vickery, James Edward, 


Taunton, 


S. 22 




Walcott, Henry Pickering, 


Salem, 


M. 14 




Warren, Winslow, 


Plymouth, 


S.5 




Wentworth, George Albert, 


Wakefield, N. H. 


S. 28 




Wentworth, Samuel Hidden, 


Concord, N. H. 


Mrs. M 


D. Wells's 


Williams, Sydney Augustus, 


Taunton, 


M. 9 





yuniors, 94. 



I04 



SENIORS. 






1857-58. 




NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


ROOMS. 


Abercrombie, Otis Putnam, 


Lunenburg, 


H'y 8 


Adams, Henry Brooks, 


Quincy, 


H'ys 


Allen, Charles Adams, 


Cambridge, 


H'y 13 


Allen, Gideon, 


New Bedford, 


H'y 17 


Ames, Fisher, 


Catnbridge, 


Mr. S. Ames's 


Anderson, Nicholas Longworth, 


Cincinnati, Ohio, 


H. II 


Bartlett, Wm. Pitt .Greenwood, 


Boston, 


H'y 24 


Beals, Joshua Gardner, 


Boston, 


G.9 


Bigelow, Alanson, 


Cambridge, 


G. 8 


Bliss, Eugene Frederick, 


Janesville, Wis. 


G. 7 


Bradbury, Charles Brooks, 


Boston, 


M. 9. 


Bradlee, Josiah, 


Bostott, 


Mr. 0. Danforth's 


Brick, Riley Allen, 


New York, N Y. 


H'y 13 


Bromberg, Frederic George, 


Mobile, Ala. 


Mr. A. Murdock's 


Brown, Benjamin Graves, 


Marblehead, 


H'y 12 


Burgess, George Canning, 


Kingston, 


Mrs. L. Stickney's 


Burt, John Otis, 


Syracuse, N. Y. 


s. 30 


Cabot, Louis, 


Brookli7ie, 


H'y 19 


Chadwick, George Bradford, 


Boston, 


Mrs. S. Humphrey's 


Cilley, Bradbury Longfellow, 


Exeter, N. H. 


S.25 


Cilley, Jonathan Longfellow, 


Cincinnati, Ohio, 


H'y 22 


Cobb, John Edward, 


Sandwich, 


G. 19 


Crosby, George Washington, 


Leof?iinster, 


M. 12 


Crowninshield, Benj. William, 


Boston, 


H'y 19 


Damon, Howard Franklin, 


Boston, 


H'y 12 


Davis, James Clarke, 


Greenfield, 


H'y 15 


Dexter, George, 


Cincinnati, Ohio, 


Misses Upham's 


Dunning, William Hale, 


Cambridge, 


H'y 24 


Edes, Robert Thaxter, 


Bolton, 


H'y 4 


Eells, Samuel Henry, 


Boston, 


G. 17 


Eliot, Paul Mitchell, 


New Bedford, 


H'y 21 


Fairchild, Charles, 


Madison Wis. 


Mr. Wm. Mills's. 


Fette, William Eliot, 


Cambridge, 


G. 8 


Foote, Henry Wilder, 


Salem, 


S.15 


Fox, William Henry, 


Taunton, 


D. 8 


Francis, George Ebenezer, 


Lowell, 


H'y 23. 



I05 



NAMES. 

Frost, Henry Walker, 
Fuller, Simon Greenleaf, 
Gelston, Robert Bruce, 
Gilbert, Horatio James, 
Goodwin, Ozias, 
Gordon, William Gilchrist, 
Green, Samuel Swett, 
Hall, James Stevenson, 
Hartwell, Alfred Stedman, 
Hawes, Marcus Morton, 
Holbrook, Daniel, 
Homans, John, 
Hunnewell, Hollis, 
Kilbourn, William Arthur, 
Kimball, Edward Harrington, 
Lamson, Ansel, 
Learoyd, Charles Henry, 
Lowell, James Jackson, 
Magoun, Thatcher, 
Mason, Edward Brorafield, 
May, James, 

Milton, William Frederick, 
Murdock, Seth Miller, 
Myrick, John Dole, 
Noble, George Washington Copp. 
Norcross, Frederick Malcolm, 
Noyes, John Buttrick, 
Park, John Gray, 
Pasco, vSamuel, 
Patten, Henry Lyman, 
Payne, Daniel Chamberlain, 
Phillips, John Charles, 
Pond, George Edward, 
Porter, Edward Griffin, 
Richardson, Henry Augustus, 
Russell, Nathaniel, 
Sawyer, Amory Pollard, 
Shaw, Joseph Alden, 
Shorey, Frank Howard, 
Spurr, Thomas Jefferson, 
Stoddard, John Thomas, 
Swinerton, John Putnam, 
Thurber, James Danforth, 
Tobey, Gerard Curtis, 
Tobey, Horace Pratt, 
Toppan, Robert Noxon, 
Townsend, James Percival, 



RESIDENCE. 

Concord, 
Amiover, 
Baltimore, Md. 
Tauntoti, 
Boston, 
New Bedford, 
Worcester, 
Troy,N. Y. 
South Natick, 
Boston, 
Cambridge, 
Boston, 
Boston, 
Groton, 
Bradford, 
Lunenburg, Vt. 
North Danvers, 
Cambridge, 
Medford, 
Boston, 

Petersburg, Va. 
yaniaica Plain, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Augusta, Me. 
Somerszvorth, N. H. 
Lowell, 
Cambridge, 
Groton, 
Charlestown, 
Kingston, N. H. 
Boston, 
Methuen, 
Boston, 
Dorchester, 
Cambridge, 
Plymouth, 
Bolton, 
Sudbury, 
Dedham, 
Worcester, 
Plymouth, 
Taunton, 
Plymouth, 
Wareham, 
Wareham, 
New York,N. Y. 
Taunton, 



ROOMS. 

H'y lo 
S. 28 
H'y ID 
H'y 16 

Mr. W. Warland's- 

H'y 21 

Mr. J. B. Kent's 

M. 25 

S. 30 

Mrs. L. Stickney's 

Mrs. D. Holbrook's 

Mr. O. Danforth's 

H'y 5 

S. 27 

M. 12 

Misses Howe's 

H'y 7 

H'y 7 

,M. 25 

Mr. W. Saunders's 

Miss E. M. Freeman's 

H. II 

H'y 22 

H'y 14 

H'y 15 

S. 28 

Rev. Dr. Noyes's 

S. 27 

Mr. J. Pasco's 

G. 21 

Mr. W. Warland's 

G. II 

H'y 23 

G. II 

H'y 17 

S. 23 

H'y 4 

M. 9 

S. 15 

G. 23 

H.25 

D. 8 

H'y 6 

S. II 

S. II 

Miss E. M. Freeman's 

H'y 14 



io6 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 




Treadwell, John Pearse, 


Portsmouth, N. H. 


S.23 


Walcott, Henry Pickering, 


Salem, 


H'y8 


Warren, Winslow, 


Plymouth, 


H'y6 


Wentworth, George Albert, 


Wakefield, N. H. 


S.25 


Wentworth, Samuel Hidden, 


Concord, N. H. 


G. 10 


Williams, Sydney Augustus, 


Taunton, 


H'y i6 



Seniors, 



I07 



THE EXHIBITIONS. 



(Only the parts assigned to members of the class of 1858 are 
given; the parts corresponding to the missing numbers were spoken 
by members of other classes.) 



ORDER OF PERFORMANCES 

FOR EXHIBITION, 

Tuesday, Oct. 21, 1856. 

3. A Latin Version. From Burke's Speech on Conciliation with 

America. 

GEORGE ALBERT WENTWORTH, Wakefield, N. H. 

4. A Latin Version. From a Speech of Charles Sumner. 

WILLIAM PITT GREENWOOD BARTLETT, Boston. 

7. A Greek Version. From Burke's " Vindication of Natural 

Society." 

CHARLES HENRY LEAROYD, Danvers. 

8. An English Version. From the " Agricola " of Tacitus. 

THOMaS JEFFERSON SPURR, Worcester. 

11. An English Version. From Petrarch's " Africa." 

FREDERIC GEORGE BROMBERG, Mobile, Ala. 

12. A Latin Version. From Everett's Phi Beta Kappa Oration. 

ALFRED STEDMAN HARTWELL, Natick. 

13. A Greek Version. From Sir Thomas Browne's " Urn-Burial." 

GEORGE WASHINGTON CROSBY, Leominster. 

16. A Latin Dialogue. From " Le Mariage Forcd." 

EUGENE FREDERIC BLISS, Janesville, Wis. 
HENRY LYMAN PATTEN, Boston. 



io8 

17, An English Version. From a Letter of St. Jerome. 

GEORGE EDWARD POND, Boston. 

20. A Greek Version, From Clay's Speech on the Recognition of 

the Independence of Greece. 

CHARLES ADAMS ALLEN, Cambridge. 

21. A Latin Version. From W. S. Landor. " Supposed Speech 

of Scipio after the Destruction of Carthage." 

JAMES JACKSON LOWELL, Cambridge. 



I09 



ORDER OF PERFORMANCES 

FOR EXHIBITION, 

Tuesday, May 5, 1857. 

3. A Latin Version. From a Speech of Edmund Burke. 

NICHOLAS LONGWORTH ANDERSON, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

6. A Latin Version. From a Speech of Brougham on Parliamentary 

Reform. 

WINSLOW WARREN, Plymouth. 

7. A Greek Dialogue. Zf^a'Axrfi %ai Kty.Qay.xi]q. 

ROBERT NOXON TOPPAN, New York, N. V. 
GEORGE EBENEZER FRANCIS, Lowe//. 

9. An English Version. From the Romaic. Extract from Tri- 
coupe's Oration on the Death of Karaiskake. 

GEORGE CANNING BURGESS, Kingston. 

11. An English Version. From Victor Hugo's Speech against 

Transportation for Political Offences. 

HENRY WILDER FOOTE, Satem. 

12, A Greek Version. From Emerson's " Nature." 

BRADBURY LONGFELLOW CILLEY, Exeter, N. H. 

15. A Latin Dialogue. From the " Bourgeois Gentilhomme." 

GEORGE WASHINGTON COPP NOBLE, Somersivorth, N.^H. 
WILLIAM HALE DUNNING, Cambridge. 

16. An English Version. From an Oration of Sallust. 

HORACE PRATT TOBEY, Wareham. 

19. An English Version. From Fichte's Addresses to the German 

People. 

FRANK HOWARD SHOREY, Dedham. 

20. A Latin Version. From Burke. " The Political Influence of 

Established Opinions." 

WILLIAM ARTHUR KILBOURN, Groton. 

21. A Greek Version. From Bacon's "Advancement of Learning." 

JOSEPH ALDEN SHAW, Sudbury. 



no 



ORDER OF PERFORMANCES 

FOR EXHIBITION, 

Tuesday, October 20, 1857. 

I. A Salutatory Oration in Latin. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON COPP NOBLE, Somersworth, N. H. 

3. A Disquisition. " The Saloons of Paris in the Eighteenth 

Century." 

ROBERT NOXON TOPPAN, New York, N. Y. 

5. A Disquisition. " The Ion of Talfourd, and the Iphigenia of 

Goethe." 

FRANK HOWARD SHOREY, Dedham. 

6. A Dissertation. "The Triumphs of Engineering." 

WILLIAM PITT GREENWOOD BARTLETT, Boston. 

9. A Dissertation. " Republican Employment of Inherited 

Wealth." 

GEORGE EDWARD POND, Boston. 

10. A Dissertation. " Courage." 

FREDERIC GEORGE BROMBERG, Mobile, Ala. 

14. A Dissertation. "The Heroic Character and the Saintly." 

CHARLES HENRY LEAROYD, North Danvers. 

15. A Disquisition. " Augustus Caesar and Louis Napoleon." 

GEORGE ALBERT WENTWORTH, Wakefield, N. H. 

18. A Disquisition. "James Boswell."' 

BRADBURY LONGFELLOW CILLEY, Exeter, N. H, 

19. A Disquisition. " Desperate Explorations." 

HORACE PRATT TOBEY, Wareham. 

22. A Dissertation. " India as a Field for Great Men." 

GEORGE WASHINGTON C^O'iY.X , Leomitister . 

23. An English Oration. "Loyalty." 

JAMES JACKSON LOWELL, Cambridge. 



Ill 



ORDER OF PERFORMANCES 

FOR EXHIBITION, 

Tuesday, May 4, 1858. 

1. A Latin Oration. " De Ciceronis Amicitiis." 

ALFRED STEDMAN HARTWELL, South Natick.. 

2. A Disquisition. *' Charles Kingsley." 

ROBERT THAXTER EDES, Bolton.. 

5. A Dissertation. " Sea-Side Studies." 

GEORGE EBENEZER FRANCIS, LowelK 

6. A Disquisition. " The Laws of the Old Colony." 

WINSLOW WARREN, Plymouth.. 

10. A Dissertation. " General Havelock." 

JOSEPH ALDEN SHAW, Sudbury. 

11. A Disquisition. "The Moral Characteristics of Tacitus." 

ANSEL LAMSON, Lunenburg, Vt. 

14. An English Poem. "The Loss of the Central America." 

WILLIAM GILCHRIST GORDON, Nezv Bedford. 

15. A Dissertation. "A Hebrew Prophet and a Modern Re- 

former." 

GEORGE CANNING BURGESS, Kingston. 

19. A Dissertation. " Livingston as a Missionary." 

WILLIAM rfALE DUNNING, Cambridge.. 

20. A Disquisition. " The Reforming Popes." 

CHARLES BROOKS BRADBURY, Boston. 

23. A Dissertation. " The Mermaid Club." 

CHARLES ADAMS ALLEN, Cambridge.. 

24. An English Oration. " Rienzi." 

EUGENE FREDERICK BLISS, Janesville, Wis.. 



112 



PRIZES. 
BOYLSTON PRIZE FOR ELOCUTION. 

JULY 19, 1855. 

Cutter, ) , , . 

' > second prizes. 
Fuller, ) 

JULY 16, 1857. 



Beals, a first prize. 
Phillips, 

MVRICK, 



;:'} 



second prizes. 



BOWDOIN PRIZE FOR DISSERTATIONS. 

Lowell, a first prize. 
Pasco, a seco?id prize. 

"Deturs were given in the Sophomore year to 



Adams, 


Francis, 


Anderson, 


Fuller, 


Bartlett, 


Gordon, 


Beals, 


Green, 


BHss, 


Hartwell, 


Bromberg, 


Hawes, 


Burgess, 


Kimball, 


Cabot, 


Lamson, 


Chadwick, 


Learoyd, 


Crosby, 


Lowell, 


Dexter, 


Murdock, 


Dorr, 


Patten, 


Dunning, 


Pond, 


Edes, 


Spurr, 


Foote, 


H. P. Tobey, 


Fox, 


Warren, 


And in the Junior year to 




B. L. Cilley, 


Shaw, 


Kilbourn, 


Walcott, 


Noble, 


G. A. Wentworth, 



113 



CLASS OFFICERS 

Chosen at Class Meetings held in March, 1858. 

Orator. 
Henry Brooks Adams. 

Poet. 

George W. C. Noble. 

r 

Odist. 
William G. Gordon. 

Chaplain. 
William H, Dunning. 

Chorister. 
Otis P. Abercrombie. 

Chronicler. 
Gerard C. Tobey. 

Class Day Committee. 

B. W. Crowninshield. George E. Pond. 

William F. Milton. 

Chairman of Class Supper. 
James May. 

Class Supper Chorister. 
John Romans. 

Class Secretary. 
Charles A. Allen. 



The Secretary and 



B. W. Crowninshield. 



114 

Class Committee. 

Robert N. Toppan. 

Marshals. 

Ozias Goodwin. 



James J. Lowell. 



Josiah Bradlee. 



Allen resigned the office of Class Secretary in 1864, and he 
was succeeded by Dexter. Dexter resigned in 1883, and was 
succeeded by Davis. Davis was elected a member of the Class 
Committee in 1863, in place of Lowell, deceased. Toppan 
resigned his membership of the Class Committee in 1872, and was 
succeeded by Frost, who resigned in 1886, and was succeeded by 
Williams. Toppan was re-elected a member of the Committee in 
1883. 



"5 



ORDER OF EXERCISES FOR CLASS DAY, 

Friday, June 25, 1858. 



PRO GRAM ME 



I. MUSIC. 
II. PRAYER, 

BY THE REV. DR. HUNTINGTON. 

III. ORATION, 

BY HENRY BROOKS ADAMS, OF QUINCY, MASS. 

IV. MUSIC. 

V. POEM, 

BY GEORGE WASHINGTON COPP NOBLE, OF SOMERSWORTH, N. H. 

VI. ODE, 

BY WILLIAM GILCHRIST GORDON, OF NEW BEDFORD, MASS. 

Alma Mater, we pause on thy threshold to-day, 

Now the time of our sojourn is o'er, 
While we turn from the hopes that allure us away. 

To ask for thy blessing once more ; 
Not a son of thy nurture can ever forget 

The mother who blesses him now; 
He will think of thee oft with a tear of regret. 

While time marks its score on his brow. 

May the sons who are leaving thy shelter to-night 

Be true to their God and to thee, 
While they faithfully strive to interpret aright 

The precepts they learned at thy knee : 
May the bread thou shall cast on the waters to-day 

Return to enrich thee at last. 
When thy sons in their gratitude strive to repay 

The debt that they owe to the past. 



ii6 

As we leave the dear home that has sheltered our youth, 

And the comrades who 've been with us here, 
While we sought 'mid the lore of the past for the truth, 

And dreamed the bright treasure was near, 
Through the scenes that are gone by our memory led. 

O'er the graves of the friends lying there. 
Shall the souls of the living commune with the dead 

While we whisper our parting in prayer. 

It is strange that our hearts should be joyous to-day 

When we part from the friends who are dear. 
That the smile and the tone should be gladsome and gay 

When the moment of parting is near ; 
But the sunlight of love as it passes away 

On the clouds of our sorrow is cast, 
And the joy that is filling our glad hearts to-day 

Is the image of joy that is past. 



ii; 



COMMENCEMENT. 



i„ust.3si.o NATHANAELI-FIIENTICE BAMS, 

GUBERNATORI, 

Honora,iss,.o ELIPHALET TRASK, 

VICE- G UBERNA TOR I, 

REIPUBLIC^ MASSACHUSETTENSIS ; 

C^TERISQUE COLLEGII HARVARDIANI CURATORIBUS 

Honorandis atque Reverendis ; 

• lACOBO WALKER, S. T. D., LL. D., 

PR^SIDI; 
Toti SEN AT U I Academico; 

Aliisque omnibus, qui in Rebus Universitatis adminsitrandis versantur 

5 
VENERANDIS ECCLESIARUM PASSIM PASTORIBUS; 

Universis denique, ubicunque terrarum, Humanitatis Cultoribus, Reique 

Publicae nostrae literarice Fautoribus ; 



ii8 



JUVENES IN ART I BUS INI TI ATI, 



Otis-Putnam Abercrombie 
Henricus-Brooks Adams 
Carolus-Adams Allen 
Gideon Allen 
Fisher Ames 

Nicolaus-Longworth Anderson 
Guilielmus-Pitt-Greenwood Bartlett 
Josua-Gardner Beals 
Alanson Bigelow 
Eugenius-Fredericus Bliss 
Carolus-Brooks Bradbury 
Josias Bradlee 
Riley-Allen Brick 
Fredericus-Georgius Bromberg 
Benjamin-Graves Brown 
Georgius-Canning Burgess 
Johannes-Otis Burt 
Ludovicus Cabot 
Georgius-Bradford Chadwick 
Bradbury-Longfellow Cilley 
Jonathan-Longfellow Cilley 
Johannes-Edvardus Cobb 
Georgius- Washington Crosby 
Benjamin-Guilielmus Crowninshield 
Howard-Franklin Damon 
Jacobus-Clarke Davis 
Georgius Dexter 
Guilielmus-Hale Dunning 
Robertus-Thaxter Edes 
Samuel-Henricus Eells 
Paulus-Mitchell Eliot 
Carolus Fairchild 
Guilielmus-Eliot Fette 
Henricus-Wilder Foote 
Guilielmus-Henricus Fox 



Georgius-Ebenezer Francis 
Henricus-Walker Frost 
Simon-Greenleaf Fuller 
Robertus-Bruce Gelston 
Horatius-Jacobus Gilbert 
Ozias Goodwin 
Guilielmus-Gilchrist Gordon 
Samuel-Swett Green 
Jacobus-Stevenson Hall 
Alfredus-Stedman Hartwell 
Marcus-Morton Hawes 
Daniel Holbrook 
Johannes Homans 
Hollis Hunnewell 
Guilielmus-Arthurus Kilbourn 
Edvardus-Harrington Kimball 
Ansel Lamson 
Carolus-Henricus Learoyd 
Jacoljus- Jackson Lowell 
Thatcher Magoun 
Evardus-Bromfield Mason 
Jacobus May 

Guilielmus-Fredericus Milton 
Seth US-Miller Murdock 
Johannes-Dole Myrick 
Georgius-Washington-Copp Noble 
Fredericus-Malcolm Norcross 
Johannes-Buttrick Noyes 
Johannes-Gray Park 
Samuel Pasco 
Henricus-Lyman Patten 
Daniel-Chamberlain Payne 
Johannes-Carolus Phillips 
Georgius-Edvardus Pond 
Edvardus-Grififin Porter 



119 



Henricus-Augustus Richardson 
Nathanael Russell 
Amory-Pollard Savvyer 
Josephus-Alden Shaw 
Francus-Howard Shorey 
Thomas-Jefferson Spurr 
Johannes-Thomas Stoddard 
Johannes-Putnam Swinerton 
Jacobus-Danforth Thurber 
Gerardus-Curtis Tobey 

HASCE 



Horatius-Pratt Tobey 
Robertus-Noxon Toppan 
Jacobus-Percival Townsend 
Johannes-Pearse Treadwell 
Jacobus- Edvardus Vickery 
Henricus-Pickering Walcott 
Winslow Warren 
Georgius-Albertus Wentworth 
Samuel-Hidden Wentworth 
Sydneius-Augustus Williams 

EXERCITA TIONES 

humillime dedicant. 



I20 



ORDER OF EXERCISES 

FOR 

COMMENCEMENT 

XXI. JULY, MDCCCLVIII. 



1. A Salutatory Oration in Latin. 

GEORGE EDWARD POND, Boston. 

2. An Essay. "The Pepperell family." 

JOHN PEARSE TREADWELL, Portsmouth, JV. H. 

3. A Disquisition. "Table-Talkers." 

SAMUEL PASCO, Charlestown. 

4. An Essay. " Peasant Heroes." 

JOHN BUTTRICK NOYES, Cambridge. 

5. A Dissertation. "Sympathy for the Sepoys." 

GEORGE CANNING BURGESS, ^m^J^o«. 

6. An Oration. " Handel as a Religious Composer." 

CHARLES HENRY LEAROYD, Danvers. 

MUSIC. 

7. A Disquisition. " The Women of the Iliad and Odyssey." 

HENRY PICKERING WALCOTT, Salem. 

8. An Essay. "Bibliomania." 

EDWARD HARRINGTON KIMBALL, Bradford. 

9. A Dissertation. " The Criticism of Quinctilian." 

GEORGE WASHINGTON CROSBY, Leominster. 

10. A Disquisition. " Lord Metcalf." 

ANSEL LAMSON, Lunenburg, Vt. 

11. An Essay. " Architecture in the United States." 

GEORGE BRADFORD CHADWICK, Boston. 

12. A Dissertation. "Burke in his Dotage." 

HENRY LYMAN PATTEN, Kingston, N. H. 



121 



MUSIC. 

13. A Disquisition. "St. Peter's,. — what it cost, and what it 

comes to." 

ROBERT THAXTER EDES, Bolton. 

14. An Essay. "Aaron Burr." 

GEORGE DEXTER, CincinnaH, Ohio. 

15. A Disquisition. "The Indians of the West." 

CHARLES FAIRCHILD, Madison, Wis. 

16. A Dissertation. " The Popularity of Queen Elizabeth." 

HORACE PRATT TOBEY, Wareham. 

17. An Oration. "Scientific Inquiry and Religious Faith." 

ALFRED STEDMAN HARTWELL, Natick. 

MUSIC. 

18. A Dissertation. " The Logic of Persecution." 

WILLIAM HALE DUNNING, Cambridge. 

19. An Essay. " Cleon, the Athenian." 

BENJAMIN GRAVES BROWN, Marblehead. 

20. A Poem. " A Call to Work." 

WILLIAM GILCHRIST GORDON, New Bedford. 

2 1. A Dissertation. "The supposed Aristocratical Bias of Shaka 

speare." 

CHARLES ADAMS ALLEN, Cambridge. 

2 2. An Oration. " Pericles and Lorenzo de' Medici." 

GEORGE ALBERT WENTWORTH, Wakefield, N. H. 

MUSIC. 

23. An Essay. " French Missionaries in the West." 

NICHOLAS LONGWORTH ANDERSON, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

24. A Disquisition. " The Character of the Slave in the Roman 

Drama." 

WINSLOW WARREN, Plymouth. 

25. An Essay. " The Eloquence of Erskine." 

JOSHUA GARDNER BEADS, Boston. 

26. An Oration. " Solon as a Poet." 

ROBERT NOXON TOPPAN, Neiv York, N. Y. 

27. A Dissertation. " Calculating Machines." 

WILLIAM PITT GREENWOOD BARTLETT, Bos/on. 



122 



MUSIC. 

28. An Essay. " Cardinal Mezzofanti." 

WILLIAM AUTHUR KILBOURN, Groton. 

29. A Disquisition. " Roman Civilization in Liberia." 

GEORGE EBENEZER FRANCIS, Lowell. 

30. An Oration. " Injurious Stimulants in Education." 

FREDERIC GEORGE BROMBERG, Mobile, Ala. 

31. A Disquisition. "The Authentic History of William Tell.'^- 

CHARLES BROOKS BRADBURY, Boston. 

32. A Dissertation. " Roman Watering-Places." 

GEORGE WASHINGTON COPP NOBLE, Sotnersworth, N. H. 

MUSIC. 

33. A Dissertation. "The Republicanism of Milton." 

FRANK HOWARD SHOREY, Dedham. 

34. An Essay. "John Cotton." 

WILLIAM HENRY FOX, Taunton. 

35. A Dissertation. " The Tories of the American Revolution." 

BRADBURY LONGFELLOW CILLEY, Exeter, N. H. 

36. A Disquisition. "The Suppression of the Templars." 

JOSEPH ALDEN SHAW, Sudbury. 

37. An Oration. " Governor Bradstreet and his Times." 

EUGENE FREDERIC BLISS, Janesville, Wis. 

MUSIC. 

38. Aa Oration. " Averages." 

JAMES JACKSON LOWELL, Cambridge. 



123 



CLASS DINNERS. 

The class have dined together since their graduation, at Porter's 
Hotel in North Cambridge, July i8, i860, twenty-eight being pres- 
ent; at the Parker House in Boston, July 16, i86r, thirty-five present; 
Parker House, July 18, 1865, fifteen present; Parker House, July 
14, 1868, twenty-nine present; Parker House, June 27, 1870, sixteen 
present; Revere House, June 24, 1873, thirty-one present; Parker 
House, June 25, 1878, forty-one present; Parker House, June 26, 1883, 
thirty-three present; Parker House, Nov. 5, 1886, twenty-nine present; 
and they are to dine at the Union Club, June 26, 1888. 



CLASS FUND. 

A FUND of $612 was raised at the time of our graduation, contributed 
by eighty-five members of the class, to pay the expenses of Class Day 
and Commencement Day, and to pay for the class cradle, the class 
book, printing the secretary's first report, etc. There remained of this 
fund in the hands of the secretary in 1864, the sum of $95.30. The 
Class Committee were instructed, in 1863, "to collect money for a class 
fund." They have since received, from fifty-eight members of the 
class, $1,851, in amounts varjing from $3 to $ico, making, together with 
the balance of the original fund, $95.30, in all, $1,946.30. Some gains 
have been made from changes of investments, and some savings from 
income after paying for entertainments on Commencement Day, class 
dinners, printing reports, and other class expenses, and the fund is in- 
vested. June 20, 1 888, as follows : — 

Par value. 

Burlin^'ton and Missouri River Railroad in Nebraska, six 

per cent bonds (exempt) ....... $1,800.00 

Atchison and Nebraska Railroad, seven per cent bonds, 1908, 300.00 
Burlington, Cedar Rapids and Northern Railroad, five per 

cent bonds, 1906. ........ 200.00 

Two shares Globe National Bank, Boston .... 200.00 

Deposit in Suffolk Savings Bank, Boston . . . . 130.16 

Cash 70.15 



$2,700.31 



124 



THE MEMORIAL WINDOW 

In Memory of our Classmates who fell in the War. 

In January, 1875, Foote, Ozias Goodwin, and Magoun were appointed 
a committee to arrange to place in Memorial Hall a stained glass win_ 
dow in memory of our classmates, Eells, Lowell, Mason, Patten, Rich_ 
ardson, and Spurr, who fell in the war. After the death of Goodwin, in 
1878, Phillips was chosen as a member of the committee in his place. 
The committee issued a circular, requesting subscriptions from the class, 
and received from them contributions which, with the gift of $100 from 
the mother of a deceased classmate, and with interest, amounted to 
$1,500, which was the cost of the window. The committee selected, as 
subjects for the two parts of the window, the figures of Leonidas and 
John Hampden, and for the inscription upon one part of the window 
these words, written by Lowell : " Died for the cause of civilization and 
law, and the self-restrained freedom which is their result"; and upon 
the other these words, which Patten wrote : " As for the chances of 
life or death, neither is welcome without honor or duty. — either is wel- 
come in the path of honor and duty." The window was made by Cottier 
■& Co., of New York, and was placed in Memorial Hall, on the north 
side, near the western end of the hall, in October, 1882. 



OTHER SUBSCRIPTIONS. 

The sum of $1,045 was contributed by the class, in 1 866-1 867, toward 
the cost of Memorial Hall; and they contributed, in 1869-1879, $2,680 
to the class subscription fund of the college; and, in 1879, $125 to iht 
memorial of General William F. Bartlett.